Mariners shut down Casper Wells due to head issue

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From beat writer Larry LaRue of the Tacoma News Tribune comes word that the Mariners have put an early end to Casper Wells’ 2011 season due to ongoing complications with his head.

The mysterious ailment, which is affecting Wells’ equilibrium, was originally diagnosed as a “severe sinus issue.” But that was ruled out this week after a visit with a specialist. Wells’ eyes have also been checked, and there’s nothing wrong with them either.

The Mariners’ medical team will continue to seek a diagnosis and a course of treatment. For now, they’ve simply shut the 26-year-old outfielder down as a precautionary measure.

“I didn’t go with the team and I’ve seen a couple of doctors this week and found out what it isn’t, we just haven’t figured out yet what it is,” Wells said Thursday. “I don’t want the perception to be I’m taking it easy – the last few weeks, I couldn’t pick up the fastball.

At first I thought it was my eyes, then I thought maybe some kind of sinus infection. In the outfield, I was having trouble seeing the ball. At the plate, the only thing I could really pick up was the curve, and I hit one for a home run in the Texas series at home.”

Wells hit .237/.317/.442 with 11 homers in 241 plate appearances this season between the Tigers and M’s.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.