Don Mattingly doesn’t want Jonathan Broxton back in 2012

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Jonathan Broxton is heading to free agency with his value at an all-time low and will be rehabbing minor elbow surgery for the next couple months.

His odds of re-signing with the Dodgers were probably slim already, but Don Mattingly made it very clear yesterday that he doesn’t want Broxton back for 2012, telling Tony Jackson of ESPN Los Angeles that he wouldn’t recommend re-signing the once dominant closer:

It’s hard to encourage anything at this point. We don’t know anything. Anybody who signs Brox at this point … they will look at his medical records and look at his past, and it’s a risk/reward thing. It’s not really the kind of season you want to be coming off of.

Mattingly is right, of course, but managers aren’t usually that candid about impending free agents who’re technically still on the team.

Broxton earned $4 million last season and $7 million this year, but he hasn’t been effective and healthy since early 2010 and his average fastball velocity has dipped from 97.8 miles per hour to 95.3 mph to 94.1 mph in the past three seasons.

Cleaning up the bone spurs in his elbow will hopefully help Broxton reclaim that lost velocity and get back on track as a dominant late-inning reliever, but he’ll likely have to settle for an incentive-laden one-year contract with a team other than the Dodgers.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.