Joe Maddon on the weight of a late-season collapse

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Joe Maddon was on the Dan Patrick show yesterday and he said something that just reinforces my belief that he’s one of the brighter bulbs in the game. Not in a “Maddon is a baseball genius” way, but just in terms of a guy who is able to move beyond the tired cliches and actually explain stuff to you once in a while.

This was about the Red Sox’ late-season collapse. Granted, since he’s not currently in a late season collapse he can speak more freely about it, but it’s nice to hear someone talk about it by saying something other than “well, you can’t press … can’t panic.”  Of course it affects people. And this affect Maddon describes resonates:

I was involved in 1995 with the Angles when we lost a 13-game lead. It was really awkward walking into the ballpark. You felt really heavy. There was this weight about it walking into the ballpark where actually your legs didn’t want to seem to work either. It’s an odd life experience and it comes through sports primarily I think when things are slipping like that. It can be difficult and you need a couple of guys more than anything to lift that burden somehow, but it’s hard to really get that burden off you when you starting doing that heavy.”

There have been a couple of times in my life when I was in some serious deep funks. And I remember that weight — in a very literal, not metaphorical sense — pressing on my body. It was hard to walk down the sidewalk. It was hard to get out of chairs.  It’s half crazy, but I wonder if there’s some way to gauge a baserunner or an outfielder’s speed in a big slump vs. his speed when things are going well. I’ve felt that weight and believe it exists.

Mariners acquire Nick Rumbelow from Yankees

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The Mariners acquired Yankees’ right-hander Nick Rumbelow in exchange for minor league righty Juan Then and left-hander JP Sears, per an official announcement on Saturday. Rumbelow made 17 appearances for the Yankees in 2015 before undergoing Tommy John surgery and could provide some bullpen depth for the Mariners in 2018.

The 26-year-old right-hander spent the majority of his 2017 season in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, where he delivered an 0.62 ERA, 2.5 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 over 29 innings. The Yankees didn’t rush Rumbelow into a full workload after he missed the 2016 season recovering from Tommy John, but he didn’t appear to have any significant setbacks with his health or performance and should be ready to compete for a role next spring.

Sears, 21, was ranked 21st in the Mariners’ organization by MLB Pipeline. He was drafted in the 11th round of the 2017 draft and features a deceptive, low-velocity fastball that he can throw for strikes to either side of the plate. In his first year of pro ball, he split 17 games between Short-Season A Everett and Single-A Clinton, turning in an 0.65 ERA, 3.9 BB/9 and 16.6 SO/9 across two levels.

Then, 17, also completed his first year of pro ball after signing with the Mariners as a free agent. He went 2-2 in 13 games of rookie ball, pitching to a 2.64 ERA, 2.2 BB/9 and 8.2 SO/9 in 61 1/3 innings. Neither Sears nor Then will take the mound for the Yankees anytime soon, and offloading Rumbelow to the Mariners should clear up some room on New York’s 40-man roster as they prepare for the upcoming Rule 5 Draft.