Brad Mills is safe, no matter what the rumors sites say

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UPDATE: ESPN has apparently taken down the post.  I’m assuming this means that Brad Mills is no longer on the hot seat. Thanks for the quick edit, guys. Everyone screws up sometimes. A quick fix is the way to go.  Except for you commenters. You still get no edit function.

8:49 AM: I was rather shocked this morning when I saw ESPN’s Rumor Central site write the following about managers on the hot seat:

The hottest seat belongs to Brad Mills, who has presided over the first 100-loss season in Houston Astros history. His contract is up at the end of the season and the Astros’ ownership group, which is still Drayton McLane at this point, show little inclination of exercising an option for 2012.

Shocked mostly because the Astros picked up Mills’ 2012 option almost a year ago, and even added an option for 2013.  Picked it up because even the Astros realize that for as crappy a team they have at the moment, it’s certainly not Mills’ fault. Unless of course he was responsible for the Astros’ poor drafting and years of procrastinating on a necessary rebuilding job.

But even if they hadn’t picked up the option, how anyone can say that what has happened in Houston is Mills’ responsibility is a bit bewildering to me.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.