Omar Infante

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Marlins 6, Braves 5: It’s all so fitting, isn’t it? Omar Infante — Braves All-Star representative in 2010 and the chit that went Florida’s way in the big trade that was supposed to improve the team — killing ’em with a walkoff homer? The Braves single greatest weapon this year, Craig Kimbrel, blowing the lead?  If it wasn’t so nausea-inducing, it would actually be comical in some way. After the game Chipper Jones and Fredi Gonzalez blamed the light configuration in Sun Life Stadium for causing Jones to lose the chopper that let Emilio Bonafacio reach right before the Infante homer. Please. They may as well just blame the cruel fates. We’re no longer playing baseball here, people. We’re in the middle of an epic tragedy. An epic, choking tragedy.

Cardinals 4, Phillies 3: More evidence that this is being controlled by some greater power and not man himself? The headline “Lohse outduels Halladay.” Like that’s going to happen without divine intercession.

Orioles 6, Red Sox 5; Red Sox 19, Orioles 9: I guess the win in the nightcap arrested the slide for now, but it’s not like Boston can feel great here. I mean, what’s the game plan?  “Let’s score 19 runs?” Erik Bedard needs to provide a nice, bullpen-saving start today.

Yankees 6, Twins 4: This one was all about the Mo.  Congratulations Mariano Rivera on save number 602.

Diamondbacks 1, Pirates 0: Ian Kennedy wins his 20th in a dominant outing (8 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 12K). Still only makes him the fourth best pitcher in the NL this year at best, but it’s still a nice outing in a breakthrough season.

Blue Jays 3, Angels 2: It’s getting dark for Anaheim. Adam Lind drove in the winning run with a 10th inning grounder, in a game full of defensive failures on the Angels’ part. They’re five back of the Rangers now.

Astros 3, Reds 2: Tie breaking homer for Matt Downs in the eighth. Four straight losses for the Reds.

Padres 8, Rockies 2: The Rockies had only one hit off CoryLuebke. It was a two-run homer, but still just the one hit.

Cubs 5, Brewers 2: Two homers for Geovany Soto. Their loss and the Cardinals’ win keeps the magic number at 4.

Mariners 12, Indians 6: A nine-run third inning tends to lead to a win. Mike Carp drove in five, including a grand slam.

Someone stole Jose Fernandez’s high school jersey after a vigil

MIAMI, FL - JULY 09:  Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins pitches during the game against the Cincinnati Reds at Marlins Park on July 9, 2015 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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People are the absolute worst sometimes. The latest example: someone stole one of Jose Fernandez’s high school jerseys, which had been displayed in his old high school’s dugout for a vigil last night.

That report comes from Anastasia Dawson of the Tampa Bay Times who covered the vigil at Alonso High School in Tampa yesterday. Her story of the vigil is here. Today she has been tweeting about the theft of the jersey. She spoke to Alonso High school’s principal who, in a bit of understatement, called the theft the “lowest of the low.”

The high school had one more Fernandez jersey remaining and has put it on display in the school. In the meantime, spread this story far and wide so that whatever vulture who stole it can’t sell it.

 

What Hall of Fame-eligible pitcher would you ask to pitch today?

Mike Mussina
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In an earlier post I made a joke about the Indians starting Dennis Martinez if forced to play a meaningless (for them) game on Monday against the Tigers. On Twitter, one of my followers, Ray Fink, asked a great question: If you had to hand the ball to a Hall of Fame-eligible pitcher to give you three innings, who would it be?

The Hall of Fame-eligible part gets rid of the recently-retired ringers, requiring a guy who has been off the scene for at least five years, ensuring that there’s a good bit of rust. I love questions like these.

My immediate answer was Mike Mussina. My thinking being that of all of the great pitchers fitting these parameters, he’s the most likely to have stayed in good shape. I mean, Greg Maddux probably still has the best pitching IQ on the planet, but he’s let himself go a bit, right? Mussina strikes me as a guy who still wakes up and does crunches and stuff.

If you extend it to December, however, you may get a better answer, because that’s when Tim Wakefield becomes eligible for the Hall. I realize a knuckleball requires practice to maintain the right touch and subtlety to the delivery, but it also requires the least raw physical effort. Jim Bouton went well more than five years without throwing his less-than-Wakefield-quality knuckler and was still able to make a comeback. I think Tim could be passable.

Then there’s Roger Clemens. I didn’t see his numbers for that National Baseball Congress tourney this summer and I realize he’s getting a bit thick around the middle, but I’m sure he can still bring it enough to not embarrass himself. Beyond the frosted tips, anyway.

So: who is your Space Cowboys-style reclamation project? Who is the old legend you dust off for one last job?