Jered Weaver losing velocity as career-high workload piles up

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Jered Weaver got himself back on track following a shaky stretch in which his ERA rose from 1.78 to 2.49 in five starts, tossing eight innings of one-run ball against the Yankees on September 9 and seven innings of one-run ball versus the A’s on Wednesday.

However, with Weaver just three innings away from tying his career-high workload Mark Saxon of ESPN Los Angeles notes that the right-hander’s velocity is down compared to early in the season.

Here are Weaver’s average fastball velocities by month from Fan Graphs:

April: 90.3 mph
May: 89.7 mph
June: 88.7 mph
July: 89.1 mph
August: 88.7 mph
September: 87.9 mph

Weaver has never been the type of pitcher to blow away hitters with fastball velocity, but he certainly seems to be wearing down somewhat. Not coincidentally his ERA has jumped from 1.86 in the first half to 3.33 in the second half and his strikeout-to-walk ratio has declined from 3.8 to 2.8.

And with the possibility of Weaver starting on short rest Sunday the Angels have to wonder how much he’ll have left in the tank if they somehow make the playoffs.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.