Mariano Rivera

OK, it is possible to overhype Mariano Rivera

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OK, I lied. It is possible to overstate the Mariano Rivera love. Here’s Kevin Kernan of the New York Post, filling out his Top Five Yankees of All Time ballot.  Note that he’s also filling out his column inches by needlessly including nicknames and descriptors of the most famous baseball players in history as if we didn’t know who they were, but that’s more of a print media criticism than a baseball analysis one.

Anyway, you may be surprised to see who he thinks Mariano Rivera is better than:

You have to start with Babe Ruth; forever he will be No. 1. The Iron Horse Lou Gehrig, who called himself the “luckiest man on the face of the Earth,” is next. No. 3 is Joltin’ Joe DiMaggio. Then comes Derek Jeter, Mr. 3,000. Rounding out the Fantastic Five is the incomparable Mariano Rivera …It hurts deeply for a kid who grew up a Mickey Mantle fan to move The Mick out of the top five, but this is the new Yankees reality. Time marches on, and Mantle, for all his greatness, does not make my final-five cut. If he had stayed healthy, it would have been a different story. Go cry to Billy Crystal.

Look, Rivera may be better at his job than most other ballplayers have been better at their jobs, but let’s be clear about something: Mariano Rivera’s job was nowhere near as important to the wins and losses of the Yankees as Mickey Mantle’s was.  You don’t need to go into advanced metrics to see this, and if you dispute it you simply don’t know what it takes to win baseball games.

If you’re not interested in the wins and losses and are looking for more of a zeitgeist thing — who meant more; who was greater in that oh-gee-whiz kind of way — well, you still have to go with Mantle. I mean, c’mon! He was the single most important Yankee to the entire Baby Boom’s worth of Yankees fans and has continued to be well past his retirement and death.  Rivera has been one of a couple of key guys in the narrative for the past 15 years or so.

This is just an exercise in “that thing that just happened is the best thing that ever happened.”  It’s also a reminder that you can overhype even the greatest stuff ever.

A fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 24:  A fan is escorted by police out of the New York Yankees dugout after climbing onto its roof, stumbling and falling into the dugout during the game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on August 24, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
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Per Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, a fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field in the eighth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Mariners.

The Yankees were heading into the bottom half of the inning when catcher Brian McCann heard “a loud thud” and looked over to find a fan laying on the dugout floor. According to McCann, the fan “basically knocked himself out.”

Manager Joe Girardi said the incident “kind of freaked me out, actually.”

McCann added, “You don’t know his intentions. It looked like he was trying to run on the field, but he didn’t make it there. It could have been worse.”

That McCann and Girardi aren’t immediately trusting of an uninvited visitor to the dugout has merit. In 2002, two fans ran onto the field and stabbed Tom Gamboa, then the Royals’ first base coach. Typically, fans that trespass are drunk and want attention, but to echo McCann’s sentiment, you never know.

Yu Darvish hit a home run

CINCINNATI, OH - AUGUST 24: Yu Darvish #11 of the Texas Rangers grounds into a double play in the second inning against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park on August 24, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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There’s a headline you’ve never read before. Rangers starter Yu Darvish has taken 12 plate appearances in the major leagues over parts of four seasons and has yet to homer. Not surprising. He pitches in the American League and wasn’t a particularly great hitter when he pitched in Japan, either. He had four singles and a double in 38 PA over parts of seven seasons from 2005-11.

Which made this all the better:

That was a 1-2 fastball from Reds starter Tim Adleman and Darvish hit it out to dead center field at Great American Ball Park. That’s a ride.