Pirates extend GM Neal Huntington through 2015

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Dejan Kovacevic of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that the Pirates have signed GM Neal Huntington to a three-year contract extension with a club option for 2015. As is often the case with front-office deals, no financial details were disclosed.

Huntington was hired as the 12th general manager in franchise history on September 25, 2007, and has done a fine job of revamping the organization since taking over. The Pirates are improving their success rate on high draft picks, they’re more active on the international market, and they’ve begun putting a better product on the field at the major league level.

Huntington has misfired on a couple of trades, namely the Jason Bay swap, but the 42-year-old executive has also pumped $48 million into the draft over the past four years — by far the highest total in the major leagues. With a continued commitment to finding and cultivating young talent, the Pirates should be able to snap their streak of consecutive losing seasons by the time Huntington’s freshly inked deal expires.

The Pirates are also expected to retain director of player development Kyle Stark, director of scouting Greg Smith and director of baseball operations Tyrone Brooks. Bucs manager Clint Hurdle is signed through 2014.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.