Major League Baseball denies the Mets the right to wear 9/11 tribute caps

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A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. Exhibit A, Major League Baseball.

The Mets — the team which in many ways served as the focal point of baseball’s return after 9/11 — had petitioned to allow players to wear NYPD and NYFD tribute caps in honor of the 10th anniversary. Just as they did after 9/11 itself.  MLB denied it, however, issuing a league-wide memo on uniforms, saying teams must wear their everyday caps with a small flag on the side instead. A no-go for the Mets. A ruling to which they adhered for tonight’s game (the Mets lost to the Cubs 10-6  in 11 innings). A stupid, stupid ruling to which they adhered.

Yes, Major League Baseball routinely denies the requests of teams to alter their caps in any way and yes, it’s understandable. There was a trend several years ago of players writing messages to injured teammates and friends and stuff, and baseball felt the need to crack down lest caps turn into the next generation of Jim McMahon headbands. I get it.

But this is just idiotic.  No one’s sensibilities would have been offended by this. Given that the tribute was to be tied to this, the anniversary of a date set in time, it would not open the door to other unofficial hats or “tributes” to more questionable causes. Baseball’s decision here makes no sense to me. It’s mindless adherence to a rule and, ultimately, it’s heartless in effect.

Bad move, Bud. Bad move.

Reds sign outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera to minor league deals

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The Reds picked up outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera on minor league deals, MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports. Both Williams and Herrera will receive invites to spring training and could compete for backup outfield roles behind Adam Duvall, Billy Hamilton and Scott Schebler.

Williams, 26, completed a three-year track with the Yankees in 2017. He has yet to see a full season of playing time, however, and went 4-for-17 with two stolen bases during a five-game span with the club in 2017. While not a power hitter, his speed and steady contact rate produced a .263/.309/.318 batting line over 437 plate appearances in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including two home runs, three triples and 19 stolen bases.

Herrera, 25, has yet to make his big league debut. After seven years in the Rockies’ system, he finally reached Triple-A Albuquerque in 2017 and slashed .278/.351/.394 with three home runs and 20 stolen bases in 363 PA. He looks most comfortable in the left field corner, but has some experience at shortstop and third base and should give the Reds a nice utility option come spring.