Charlie Morton is out of the Pirates rotation

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At least for now. He’s bring moved aside in favor of lefty Jeff Locke.

I realize that this of little interest to non-Pirates fans and non-fantasy players (uber deep league fantasy players if guys like Morton and Locke are implicated), but a story like this interest me because they shows us just how damn long the baseball season is.

Remember back in April how Charlie Morton was doing so well? How he had turned it all around because he re-did his delivery to ape Roy Halladay?  And it worked for a while too.  Yet here we are now in September and Morton’s stuggles are being attributed to his delivery being weird to him and his body suffering as a result.

Better to have a little success for a while than none at all, and it’s possible, of course, that Morton will figure it out again.  But man, there is just nowhere to hide in a 162-game season.  Over time, the truth, often the painful truth, comes out.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”