Kansas City Royals v Oakland Athletics

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights


Athletics 7, Royals 0:  Guillermo Moscoso took a no-hitter into the eighth inning . He allowed only two hits in all in eight and two-thirds and, between his last start against the Mariners and this one against the Royals, retired 30 batters in a row. Heck, if a hitting streak can stretch between two seasons, I’d say we can give Moscoso a perfect game for that, right?

Mets 1, Marlins 0: In an unexpected turn of events, Dickey beat Hand.  Oh please. Like you haven’t been waiting for that one all year.

Rays 5, Rangers 4: A walkoff homer for Desmond Jennings in the bottom of the 10th. The Rays are eight seven back of the Red Sox for the wild card and start a three-game series against them on Friday. Funny that people will talk about the AL Central “race” or the NL Central “race,” when each of those have wider deficits than this wild card thing and no one — really no one — talks about the Rays as if they have a shot. Which I don’t really think they do, but I do think it’s interesting that no one says anything. Well, I just said something, but I don’t really count.

Orioles 5, Yankees 4: Mark Reynolds struck out four times and then hit what ended up being the tie-breaking single in the 10th. That’s pretty much Mark Reynolds for you. This game was filled with fill-ins, and the regular starters who did play were likely gassed after that late game Tuesday night/Wednesday morning. And it rained some more, which everyone has to be sick of.

Tigers 8, Indians 6: Justin Verlander wasn’t really on his game and it took a Tigers rally in the top of the seventh after he had already thrown his last pitch for him to get the win. But hey, he got the win and someone will give him MVP votes because of it, conveniently forgetting the specifics of this game. Shelley Duncan hit two homers off Verlander. Which was pretty cool for me on a personal level as I got to tell my daughter Mookie that her favorite player totally pwned the best pitcher in the American League.

Phillies 3, Braves 2: And the sweep. Ross Gload with the pinch-hit RBI single in the ninth to win it. And of course it came off the Braves’, what, fourth? Fifth best reliever? Because you can’t use your closer in a tie game on the road? GRRRRRR.

Cardinals 2, Brewers 0: Chris Carpenter tosses a four-hit shutout. The Cardinals are creeping up on the Braves in the wild card chase, by the way. Six and a half back. And they have a series coming up against the Braves in St. Louis tomorrow.

Diamondbacks 5, Rockies 3: Arizona finishes a six-game road trip at 4-2 and play 13 of their last 19 games at home.

Padres 3, Giants 1: The Giants drop their third in the last four games. Aaron Harang allowed one run in seven innings.

Angels 3, Mariners 1: Jerome Williams gave up only one hit — a homer — in eight innings of work. Who’d a thunk he would be helping keep someone’s playoff hopes alive this year?

Twins 5, White Sox 4: The Twins scored four in the third — their first scoring in 20 innings — and they snapped a five game losing streak. Ozzie “I don’t think we lose. I think we just gave this game away.” Sometimes that kind of sentiment is construed as a slam on the other team. But since this was the Twins, it’s probably the best explanation.

Cubs 6, Reds 3: Carlos Pena with a three-run homer in the eighth to break the tie. After the game he talked about coming up in those kinds of situations and how, oftentimes, hitters try “to do too much.”  “See, I could have swung extra hard to try to hit a grand slam with two men on, but I settled for the three-run homer,” I imagined him thinking.

Blue Jays 11, Red Sox 10: Tim Wakefield keeps trying to get that 200th win. Last night the bullpen collapsed, allowing five runs in the eighth and six overall to snatch defeat. This kind of thing should be more concerning for the team, however, than it is for Tim Wakefield’s pursuit of a round number.

Pirates 5, Astros 4:  Andrew McCutchen homered twice. Clint Hurdle got his 600th career victory.

Dodgers vs. Nationals: POSTPONED: My kid’s soccer game went on in driving rain, as scheduled. Man-up, baseball players. Well, no, not really. I understand the difference (dirt, mostly). I just want to tell people that even though I was sick as a dog yesterday I went out to the soccer field anyway, stood in a downpour and watched six-year-old boys hog a soccer ball. Next time I bring the flask.

CC Sabathia checking into an alcohol rehab center

sabathia getty

This is totally unexpected and definitely unfortunate: The New York Yankees just released a statement from CC Sabathia saying that he is checking himself into an alcohol rehabilitation center.

Sabathia, who was involved in a relatively minor incident outside a nightclub back in August, has battled injuries and ineffectiveness for the past three seasons but has, in his last few starts, shown himself to be effective, even if he’s not to the level he once was. And, should the Yankees advance past the Wild Card game, one would have assumed that the Yankees would’ve been counting on him for the playoff rotation. Now, however, that seems both doubtful and completely superfluous.

And for what it’s worth, Sabathia’s statement, just released by the Yankees, suggests that he is aware of the need to get his priorities in order:

“Today I am checking myself into an alcohol rehabilitation center to receive the professional care and assistance needed to treat my disease.

“I love baseball and I love my teammates like brothers, and I am also fully aware that I am leaving at a time when we should all be coming together for one last push toward the World Series. It hurts me deeply to do this now, but I owe it to myself and to my family to get myself right. I want to take control of my disease, and I want to be a better man, father and player.

“I want to thank the New York Yankees organization for their encouragement and understanding. Their support gives me great strength and has allowed me to move forward with this decision with a clear mind.

“As difficult as this decision is to share publicly, I don’t want to run and hide. But for now please respect my family’s need for privacy as we work through this challenge together.

“Being an adult means being accountable. Being a baseball player means that others look up to you. I want my kids — and others who may have become fans of mine over the years — to know that I am not too big of a man to ask for help. I want to hold my head up high, have a full heart and be the type of person again that I can be proud of. And that’s exactly what I am going to do.

“I am looking forward to being out on the field with my team next season playing the game that brings me so much happiness.”

Here’s hoping Sabathia deals with whatever problems he’s facing and comes out healthy on the other end.

Diamondbacks fire pitching coach Mike Harkey

Oliver Perez, Mike Harkey
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Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic reports that the Diamondbacks have fired pitching coach Mike Harkey following a season in which the staff ranked ninth among NL teams in runs allowed.

That actually represents a big improvement from last season, when the Diamondbacks allowed the second-most runs in the league in Harkey’s first year as pitching coach, but the Tony La Russa-led front office has decided to make a change.

Prior to joining the Diamondbacks two offseasons ago Harkey served as the Yankees’ bullpen coach from 2008-2013. He pitched eight seasons in the majors.