Josh Beckett: slow as molasses and no one seems to care

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In addition to the maddening Curt Schilling-Nomar Garciaparra back-and-forth, another thing that made the Yankees-Red Sox game so damn hard to watch last night was its pace. Yes, I realize that’s an old complaint, but it’s still a valid one. These games are interminable and it really drives me nuts.

It’s especially bad when Josh Beckett is pitching. He takes FOREVER to come set and deliver a pitch, and it’s the same whether there is a runner on base or not.  Sure, he’s usually effective, undermining that whole “don’t think, it can only hurt the ballclub” rule, but it’s an aesthetic nightmare.

Terry Francona talked about with with WEEI’s Mike Petraglia yesterday, and he said that he had no intention of speeding Beckett up. He doesn’t want to throw him off his game.  His quote: “if I have my choice of him pitching slow and winning and getting a letter from the [MLB], that’s what I’d go with rather than him hurry and get knocked around.”

And you know what? Francona is right about that. It should not be his job to speed his pitcher up. All he should care about is winning baseball games.

But it is someone else’s job: Major League Baseball’s. And that job should not, as Francona implies, be carried out in the form of letters suggesting to managers that they do something about slow play. Letters which, as Francona demonstrates, he can ignore with impunity. There is a rule on the books that covers it and it covers it quite thoroughly. It’s Rule 8.04:

When the bases are unoccupied, the pitcher shall deliver the ball to the batter within 12 seconds after he receives the ball. Each time the pitcher delays the game by violating this rule, the umpire shall call “Ball.” The 12-second timing starts when the pitcher is in possession of the ball and the batter is in the box, alert to the pitcher. The timing stops when the pitcher releases the ball.

The intent of this rule is to avoid unnecessary delays. The umpire shall insist that the catcher return the ball promptly to the pitcher, and that the pitcher take his position on the rubber promptly. Obvious delay by the pitcher should instantly be penalized by the umpire.

Baseball should not single out Josh Beckett for enforcement of this rule. It should enforce it across the board.  With umpires empowered to call balls when pitchers dilly-dally. And, I will add, to penalize hitters if they similarly dilly-dally. If this requires some rules tweaks — say, because we now think 12 seconds is a bit too harsh or because we need a different way to deal with hitters — fine.

But baseball needs to take responsibility for this because its failure to do so until now has resulted in a poor product.

Yankees sign top two draft picks

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The Yankees signed first-round draft pick Clarke Schmidt and second-round pick Matt Sauer on Saturday, per a team announcement. Schmidt, a right-hander from the University of South Carolina, is set to earn a signing bonus of $2,184,300. According to MLB.com’s Oliver Macklin, that’s much lower than the typical $3+ million allocated for a No. 16 overall pick. The opposite is true for Sauer, whose projected $2.5 million signing bonus tops the suggested $1.2 million reserved for a No. 54 pick.

Schmidt, 21, boasts an impressive four-pitch repertoire and profiles as a front-end or mid-rotation starter, according to reports from Yankees’ VP of Domestic Amateur Scouting Damon Oppenheimer and ESPN’s Keith Law, among others. He carried a 4-2 record through nine starts in 2017 and turned in a 1.34 ERA before undergoing season-ending Tommy John surgery last month to repair a torn UCL in his right elbow. While the Yankees won’t see him pitch at any level until late 2018, they seem confident in his makeup and ability to rebound over the next couple of years.

Fellow right-hander and Righetti High School senior Matt Sauer is a different story altogether. The 18-year-old hurler appears destined for the bullpen with a polished fastball-slider combo and a promising curveball and changeup. He dazzled on the mound this year, going 9-1 with an 0.98 ERA and two shutouts over 78 1/3 innings. While the Yankees seem most interested in his pitching skills, Sauer showed some pop at the plate as well, touting a .427 average with 24 RBI through 135 plate appearances.

Three A’s rookies hit their first big league home runs on Saturday

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The Athletics followed Friday’s 3-0 shutout with a rookie-led home run derby on Saturday afternoon, watching not one, not two, but three rookies belt their first major league home runs off of the White Sox’ James Shields.

Right fielder Matt Olson was the first to strike, taking Shields deep on a first-pitch, two-run blast in the first inning for his first home run in 49 major league plate appearances:

Fellow outfielder Jaycob Brugman duplicated his teammate’s results in the second inning with a solo home run, his first extra-base hit of any kind since he made his debut on June 9:

In the third, with a comfortable 4-0 lead backing two scoreless frames from Oakland right-hander Daniel Gossett, Franklin Barreto took his shot at Shields. After getting the call several hours prior to Saturday’s game, he became the fastest of the three rookies to record his first big league homer, going yard on a 2-2 changeup and driving in Bruce Maxwell to give the A’s a six-run advantage.

The Athletics currently lead the White Sox 8-2 in the top of the sixth inning.