Mariners sign GM Jack Zduriencik to multi-year extension

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According to Shannon Drayer of ESPN 710 AM in Seattle, the Mariners have signed general manager Jack Zduriencik to a multi-year contract extension.

The Mariners finished 40 games under .500 last season and sit 20 games under .500 here in 2011, but Zduriencik is widely regarded as one of baseball’s most forward-thinking executives and Seattle’s higher-ups clearly have confidence that he’s leading the youth-heavy club in the right direction.

Zduriencik — or “Jack Z” if you’re not big on spelling things out — began his professional baseball career back in 1973 as a player with the White Sox’s affiliate in the Gulf Coast League. He never made it to the major leagues and eventually moved into an off-field role, serving as an area scout for the Mets from 1983-1989.

Zduriencik bounced around in the 90s before latching on as the Brewers’ director of scouting near the end of the decade. That gig led to a front office job with Milwaukee in 2006, and in October 2008 the Mariners made him their general manager and executive vice president of baseball operations. Now he’ll remain in that role for another several seasons, and will look to bring winning baseball back to the Great Northwest.

Zduriencik has misfired on some deals, namely the Chone Figgins free-agent signing, but he has a knack for scouting and player evaluation, and would seem to be the right fit going forward for the rebuilding M’s.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.