Cards approached Lance Berkman in July about extension

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The Cardinals drew phone calls from at least one contending team earlier this week when right fielder Lance Berkman passed through waivers unclaimed and became eligible to be traded to any major league club. But Berkman hasn’t been dealt, and won’t be dealt, because the Redbirds are hoping to make him part of their plans for 2012 and beyond.

Richard Justice of the Houston Chronicle told a St. Louis radio program on Wednesday morning that the Cardinals approached Berkman about a contract extension in July and that the 35-year-old slugger “very much wants to stay” in the Gateway City.

Berkman probably wants to head to free agency this winter to see what kind of money other teams are offering. But he’s found a kind of comfort zone in St. Louis and the Cardinals should have a spot for him next season — either in right field or at first base, depending on the end result of Albert Pujols’ own free agency.

Berkman, currently playing out a one-year, $8 million deal, has batted .286/.402/.565 with 30 home runs and 81 RBI across 478 plate appearances this season for second-place St. Louis. He hasn’t spent a single day on the disabled list and was named a National League All-Star for the sixth time back in July.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.