And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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White Sox 3, Twins 0: Mark Buehrle threw seven and two-thirds shutout innings. And the game came in at two hours four minutes. Knock me over with a feather. Most underrated pitcher of the past decade?

Cubs 7, Giants 0: Great pitching all-around for the Chicago clubs last night. A two-hit shutout for Randy Wells. Once you adjust for the fact that it came against the Giants, it’s worth, oh, a 9-hit, 3-run performance, which is still very, very good.

Diamondbacks 5, Rockies 1: The Diamondbacks win their seventh straight and open up a five game lead in the west. Given that the Giants don’t seem to have a first gear let alone an extra one, is this thing over?

Phillies 3, Reds 2: Cole Hamels looked really, really good in his return from the DL (6 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 7K, 0 BB). He got the no decision, but it was the right call by Manuel to pull him when he did. The pen was rested and there’s no sense taxing that arm now when it will be needed in October. Shane Victorino’s two-run homer in the eighth was the big blow. Yonder Alonso, sadly, didn’t have any opportunities for adventure down at third base for the Reds. Placido Polanco did for the Phillies, though, and he let a run in on a throwing error, so take that Alonso-haters.

Mets 2, Marlins 1: Mets 5, Marlins 1: A four game winning streak for the Mets. These two came behind nice outings from R.A. Dickey in the first game and Dillon Gee in the second.

Indians 2, Athletics 1: Tough luck loss for Brandon McCarthy, who struck out ten and gave up two runs in eight innings. But David Huff was sharp himself, shutting out the A’s on three hits over six and then letting four relievers seal the deal.

Yankees 3, Orioles 2: I think New York has been in Baltimore for seven or eight weeks now. A two-run homer for Nick Swisher. David Robertson gave up his first home run all year, but it ended up not mattering. Six strong innings from Freddy Garcia.

Blue Jays 7, Rays 3: Johnny Damon hit two homers, but Jose Bautista hit one and his teammates played better and they won, so that makes him more valuable. At least I think that’s how that works. I’m actually kind of confused about it all.

Royals 9, Tigers 5: The Royals rapped out 18 hits, pummeling Max Scherzer. Kansas City is only 17 and a half back!

Astros 7, Pirates 4: Wandy Rodriguez struck out 13 and Carlos Lee hit a three-run homer. Probably worth noting that since the Pirates little mid-season surge ended they’ve actually been no better than the Astros.

Dodgers 4, Padres 1: A complete game for Clayton Kershaw. Three hits for the now-contrite and perhaps not-as-hurt-as-he-initially-let-on Andre Ethier.

Mariners 5, Angels 3: A two-run eighth inning homer by Mike Carp puts the M’s over the top. Sadly, the Angels did not have Trout available to counter Carp. And if you think I’m not gonna beat that one into the ground in the coming years, well, you’re just not familiar with my work.

CC Sabathia wants to return to the Yankees in 2018

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CC Sabathia‘s contract is set to expire this offseason, but for the long-tenured left-hander, nowhere feels more like home than New York. “I want to see this through,” Sabathia told reporters after a devastating Game 7 loss in the ALCS. “This is where I want to play.” Yankees’ GM Brian Cashman spoke warmly of the veteran starter, but would make no public guarantees that he’d return to the team next spring.

Sabathia, 37, just topped off his 17th season in the big leagues and his eighth career postseason run. He went 14-5 in 27 starts and put up a 3.69 ERA, 3.0 BB/9 and 7.3 SO/9 in 148 2/3 innings, good for 1.9 fWAR. He looked solid in the playoffs, too, propelling the team to a much-needed win in Game 5 of the ALDS and returning in the Championship Series with six scoreless innings in Game 3. His season ended on a sour note during Game 7, however. He lasted just 3 1/3 innings against a dynamic Astros’ offense, allowing one run on five hits and three walks and failing to record a single strikeout for the first time in 23 career postseason appearances.

Heading into the 2017 offseason, Sabathia finally arrived at the end of his seven-year, $161 million deal with the Yankees. While he’s repeatedly expressed a desire to keep pitching, despite rumors that his career might be on the rocks following the diagnosis of a troublesome degenerative knee condition, the decision isn’t his alone to make. Brian Cashman will also be seeking an extension with the Yankees this winter, so it’s difficult to say which impending free agents the club will try to retain — and Sabathia’s name isn’t the only one on that list. If it were up to skipper Joe Girardi, who is awaiting a decision on his own future with the organization, the decision would be a no-brainer. From MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch:

CC will always be special to me because of what he stands for and the great player that he is, the great man that he is,” Girardi said. “The wonderful teammate that he is. How he pulls a team together. He’s as good as I’ve ever been around when it comes to a clubhouse guy, a guy that will take the ball when you’re on a losing streak or that you can count on, and knowing that it could be the possible last time.