And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

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Rays 12, Blue Jays 0: David Price was dominant, punching out 14 Blue Jays. Not literally. If he actually punched them out he would probably have been arrested.

Rangers 9, Angels 5: Josh Hamilton and Elvis Andrus combined to go 6 for 9 with five driven in. Jered Weaver hung tough for a while on short rest, but really didn’t have it. Not sure about that whole short rest thing on a 100+ degree day, but I guess decisions like that are why they pay Mike Scioscia the big bucks. The Rangers take two of three to retain a three-game lead over the Angles. They meet again in the final series of the season.

Orioles 2, Yankees 0, Yankees 8, Orioles 3: I don’t believe the Yankees actually contested this double header given that the Orioles organization is still dealing with Mike Flanagan’s death.

Reds 5, Nationals 4: Your standard 14-inning, won by a walkoff-by-Joey-Votto affair. Both managers were ejected. So too was Nationals’ bench coach and by then acting manager Pat Corrales. Why yes, it was Joe West’s crew umpiring. Why do you ask? Nineteen strikeouts for Reds pitchers.

Brewers 3, Cubs 2: There’s no place like home: Zack Greinke goes to 10-0 at Miller Park. The Brew Crew sweep the Cubs.

Cardinals 7, Pirates 4: Kyle Lohse wins his 100th career game. If you put a gun to my head I never would have guessed that he had that many wins. Some guys just fly under the radar I suppose.

Twins 11, Tigers 4: For the past couple of days I’ve noticed people tweeting that the bottom third of the Twins’ lineup was laughable. Luke Hughes was in that bottom third yesterday and drove in five. On Saturday he drove in three.

Royals 2, Indians 1: Bruce Chen just knows how to win. OK, that’s not fair. Usually I use that as a backhanded compliment for mediocre guys who luck into wins. True, Chen is mediocre and has won five straight, but this one was legit. Chen allowed one run on five hits in seven and a third, salvaging one game of the series for the Royals.

White Sox 9, Mariners 3: The sweep. And now the Sox are in second place. It’s a distant second place in a crap division, but hey, second place.

Diamondbacks 6, Padres 1: Aaron Hill was 3 for 5 with three RBI and Ian Kennedy got his 17th win. Guys the Diamondbacks trade for are the new inefficiency.

Astros 4, Giants 3:  Matt Downs had the go-ahead RBI single in the 11th. The Giants are now four back of Arizona and have looked pretty crappy getting there.

Rockies 7, Dodgers 6: Four RBI for Kevin Kouzmanoff give the Dodgers their first loss in a week.

Athletics vs. Red Sox, Phillies vs. Marlins, Braves vs. Mets: POSTPONED: Irene-pocalypse.

Justin Turner is a postseason monster

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A not-insignificant amount of the Dodgers’ success in recent years has to do with the emergence of Justin Turner. In his first five seasons with the Orioles and Mets, he was a forgettable infielder who had versatility, but no power. The Mets non-tendered him after the 2013 season, a move they now really regret.

In four regular seasons since, as a Dodger, Turner has hit an aggregate .303/.378/.502. His 162-game averages over those four seasons: 23 home runs, 36 doubles, 83 RBI, 80 runs scored. And he’s also a pretty good third baseman, it turns out. The Dodgers have averaged 95 wins per season over the past four years.

Turner, 32, has gotten better and better with each passing year. This year, he drew more walks (59) than strikeouts (56), a club only five other players (min. 300 PA) belonged to, and he trailed only Joey Votto (1.61) in BB/K ratio (1.05). He zoomed past his previous career-high in OPS, finishing at .945. His .415 on-base percentage was fourth-best in baseball. His batting average was fifth-best and only nine points behind NL batting champion Charlie Blackmon.

It doesn’t seem possible, but Turner has been even better in the postseason. He exemplified that with his walk-off home run to win Game 2 of the NLCS against the Cubs. Overall, entering Wednesday night’s action, he was batting .363/.474/.613 in 97 postseason plate appearances. In Game 4, he went 2-for-2 with two walks, a single, and a solo home run. That increases his postseason slash line to .378/.495/.659, now across 101 plate appearances. That’s a 1.154 OPS. The career-high regular season OPS for future first-ballot Hall of Famer Albert Pujols was 1.114 in 2008, when he won his third career MVP Award. Statistically, in the postseason, Turner hits slightly better than Pujols did in the prime of his career. Of course, we should adjust for leagues and parks and all that, but to even be in that neighborhood is incredible.

In the age of stats, the concept of “clutch” has rightfully eroded. We don’t really allow players to ascend to godlike levels anymore like the way we did Derek Jeter, for instance. (Jeter’s career OPS in the playoffs, by the way, was a comparatively pitiful .838.) Turner isn’t clutch; he’s just a damn good hitter whose careful approach at the plate has allowed him to shine in the postseason and the Dodgers can’t imagine life without him.