About Joe Buck’s voice

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People have noticed Joe Buck’s obviously weakened voice since the beginning of the season. As it was revealed last month, he’s the victim of a virus that has affected a nerve in his throat, and in turn, his vocal cords.  It’s killing his high register — wasn’t aware he had one, but hey, you learn something new every day — and is affecting his overall tone.

There was a story in the New York Times yesterday in which Buck talked all about it. He’s getting better, it seems, though the whole recovery process could take many more months.  All of which makes me wonder about why he’s still calling FOX’s top games in both baseball and football.

This is not some personal shot at Buck, a pile-on bash of his broadcast style, or some cold-hearted jab regarding his medical condition. It’s simply a realization that this condition is adversely affecting FOX broadcasts.  It is his job is to be the voice of the sports he’s broadcasting and his voice itself continues to be a distraction — sometimes a serious distraction — from the game itself.

If he had some sort of illness that affected his ability to work a full schedule but which would not substantially impact his ability to do his job when he could work it would be a totally different story. But this is different. This isn’t a matter of making an accommodation for someone whose temporary medical condition makes the logistics of doing the job a bit more challenging. It’s a situation in which the temporary medical condition is adversely affecting the quality of the work itself and for which there doesn’t appear to be an accommodation which can fix it.

Maybe that’s insensitive. I don’t know. But the product really is suffering. And it will only become a bigger problem once the playoffs start and the games themselves get bigger.

Former major league pitcher Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez dies in traffic accident

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Former Phillies right-hander Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez died in a traffic accident in Havana on Thursday, per reports from the El Nuevo Herald and CiberCuba. No other deaths or injuries have been reported in connection to the accident. Gonzalez was 34 years old.

The Cuban righty defected from his home country in 2013 and signed a three-year, $12 million contract with the Phillies. A bout of right shoulder tendinitis compromised his bid for a major league role, but he finally broke through to the big leagues at the tail end of the 2014 season and turned in a 6.75 ERA, 5.1 BB/9 and 8.4 SO/9 in just six outings. Another case of shoulder inflammation derailed any progress he might have made in 2015, however, and he recorded just five innings in Triple-A Lehigh Valley before the team officially released him prior to the 2016 season.

The Phillies released a statement following news of Gonzalez’s death: