Drew Butera is chasing the wrong kind of history

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Twins catcher Drew Butera isn’t in the majors for his bat. Or for really any reason I can tell. But there he was in Minnesota’s lineup for the 57th time this season on Thursday, and he ended up 0-for-4 in a 6-1 loss to the Orioles. He’s 6-for-55 since the All-Star break, and he’s hitting just .160 for the season.

With Thursday’s game, Butera reached 200 plate appearances for the season.  Here are all of the players since 1961 to hit .160 or worse in at least 200 plate appearances:

1. Roy Oyler: .135 in 247 PA (1968 Tigers)
2. Brandon Wood: .146 in 243 PA (2010 Angels)
3. Bob Uecker: .150 in 221 PA (1967 Phillies & Braves)
4. Jim Mason: .152 in 251 PA (1975 Yankees)
5. Al Weis: .155 in 213 PA (1966 White Sox)
6. Nate Colbert: .156 in 260 PA (1975 Tigers & Expos)
7. Dick Tracewski: .156 in 240 PA (1968 Tigers)
8. Andruw Jones: .158 in 238 PA (2008 Dodgers)
9. Ken Williams: .159 in 243 PA (1988 White Sox)
10. Gus Triandos: .159 in 237 PA (1962 Orioles)

So, unless the Twins find themselves a new backup catcher tomorrow, Butera could well become the first player since 1975 to hit .160 or worse in at least 250 plate appearances.  Greg Vaughn’s .163 in 297 plate appearances for the 2002 Rays is the worst mark since.

Of course, Adam Dunn, with his .165 average in 431 plate appearances, could also have something to say about all of this.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.