Joe Girardi

Great moments in small ball: Joe Girardi


It’s not my intent to mercilessly rip Joe Girardi here. I think he does a good job overall, especially when you realize how many critics he has and how much scrutiny he’s under. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t find, oh, I dunno, teachable moments in his managerial decisions.

Down by two in the ninth inning, A’s closer Andrew Bailey gave up a homer to Jorge Posada.  It’s written on ancient scrolls that if you give up a homer to Jorge Posada, you don’t have your best stuff.  Russell Martin and Brett Gardner then reached, putting runners on first and second, the Yankees down by two. Derek Jeter then comes up. The same Derek Jeter who has been hot of late and who had reached base four times in this game alone already.  This is a recipe for a big honking inning.

Except Joe Girardi had him lay down a bunt. And the Yankees only scored one more time, leaving the bases juiced in their one-run loss. If only they had one more out to give.  In fact, let’s go to Pinstriped Bible’s Steven Goldman who can tell us exactly what the odds were of scoring two runs if the Yankees had that one more out to give:

[T]eams that have put runners on first and second with no outs have scored an average of 1.4 runs … Teams that have runners on second and third with one out see their expected runs go down to 1.3 … I leave it to you whether eliminating the double play was worth trading that fraction of a run as well as the possibility of having three chances to score those two runs instead of two.

Joe Girardi gets mocked by writers for using his famous binder which sets forth this strategy and that strategy for him.  In this case, however, he should be mocked for not using his binder. Or at least for having a binder that didn’t have all of the information he needed in that situation to make the right decision.

Video: Kelby Tomlinson slides in for an inside-the-park home run

Kelby Tomlinson
AP Photo
1 Comment

Giants second baseman Kelby Tomlinson looked more like Ladainian Tomlinson the way he was running during Saturday afternoon’s game against the Rockies. In the first inning with one out against starter Chris Rusin, Tomlinson hit a fly ball into the right-center field gap at AT&T Park, a great place to go if you’re in the mood for an inside-the-park home run.

Neither Carlos Gonzalez nor Chris Dickerson could corral the ball before it rolled all the way to the 421-foot marker at the fence. Tomlinson motored around the bases, but Gonzalez made a strong throw into cut-off man D.J. LeMahieu, and LeMahieu made a great throw in to catcher Tom Murphy, but Tomlinson slid in safely just ahead of the tag.

It was an exciting play and the hit proved important as the Giants eked out a 3-2 win against the Rockies.

Santiago Casilla’s 2016 option vests for $6.5 million

Santiago Casilla
AP Photo
Leave a comment

Giants closer Santiago Casilla got the final two outs of Saturday’s 3-2 win against the Rockies, earning his 38th save. More importantly for him, however, was that it was his 55th game finished of the season. As Alex Pavlovic of CSN Bay Area notes, Casilla’s 2016 option worth $6.5 million vested once the final out was recorded.

The Giants won’t complain, as Casilla has had a terrific year. The 35-year-old is now 38-for-44 in save situations with a 2.79 ERA and a 62/23 K/BB ratio in 58 innings.