Mariners won’t bench struggling Ichiro Suzuki

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Ichiro Suzuki is having the worst season of his career and his streak of consecutive 200-hit seasons is all but certain to end at 10, but manager Eric Wedge said yesterday that he has no plans to bench the 37-year-old right fielder down the stretch.

“We’re going to continue to give him opportunities at the top of the lineup as we play this out,” Wedge told Larry Stone of the Seattle Times. “As long as he’s physically able, I think he’s earned that.”

Wedge noted that it’s tough for the coaching staff to help Suzuki bust out of slumps because “it’s such a unique style” of hitting and “not something you can break down.”

Ichiro hit at least .300 with a .350 on-base percentage in each of his first 10 seasons, but is batting just .269 with a .307 OBP through 125 games and his .631 OPS is 116 points below his previous career-low. He’d need 59 hits in the Mariners’ final 36 games to reach 200 for the 11th straight season and prior to this year Suzuki averaged 51 hits per 36 games for his career.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”