Dbacks trade Kelly Johnson to Toronto for Aaron Hill, John McDonald

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It’s being reported — sorry, not sure who got it first; the earthquake has rendered Twitter almost unreadable — that the Diamondbacks have traded Kelly Johnson to Toronto for Aaron Hill and John McDonald.

Johnson is a year removed from a 26-homer, .284/.370/.496 season, though he’s struggling mightily this year. There’s still power — 18 homers — but he’s been all or nothin’ in that regard. And he is neither getting on base nor, apparently, impressing Kirk Gibson all that much. Meanwhile, Hill, a former All-Star with big power of his own, is himself struggling for the second year in a row.  McDonald is basically a throw-in, but he’ll provide some middle infield depth that isn’t Willie Bloomquist.

Hill is subject to club options at $8 million, $8 million and $10 million over the next three years, respectively. Unless he shows that he’s able to hit again, and fast, however, you have to think that the Dbacks will just say forget it and decline them. Then again, they may just want him for a potential down-the-stretch power boost that a change of scenery will give him.  As for the Jays, they just seem to be tired of the guy.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.