Brian Schneider is why the Phillies win so much? Um, OK.

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Look, I know it’s a long season and that you have to come up with new stuff to write about all of the time, but does anyone besides me have problems with a story which suggests that the backup catcher is the key to everything? In this case, Brian Schneider of the Phillies:

With expectations set at a World Series championship, victories are what matter in Philadelphia, and when Schneider is behind the plate the Phillies win at an incredible rate. In his 26 starts this season, the Phillies are 23-3; 24-3 if you add their win against the Arizona Diamondbacks on April 27 in which Schneider entered the game in the first inning.

This after several paragraphs talking about how much Schneider has struggled individually and how, over the course of his career, he’s never been on teams that had much success. “At first glance, Schneider’s numbers are pedestrian at best, anemic at worst,” the article says. It doesn’t talk about second or third glances, which pretty much confirm it.

I’m sure Schneider is a great guy. I’m happy for the fact that he is on a team that has a great chance to with the World Series. But isn’t it possible to say that and leave it at that rather than to suggest that he brings some special something that helps a team that is already loaded with superstars be better?

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.