New York Mets v Philadelphia Phillies

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights


Phillies 10, Mets 0: Actual conversation that took place between a Mets fan I randomly met and I yesterday: the two of us trying to pinpoint exactly when the season ended for New York. Think hard about it: there are so many possible instances you can point to and say “There! Right there! That’s when it was clear that things were effectively over for the Mets.”

Mariners 3, Indians 2: Tribe closer Chris Perez comes into a tie game in the ninth, hits a dude, hits another dude, and then throws the ball away on a sacrifice attempt. I guess the error ended up not mattering — the g0-ahead run scored on a sac fly that would have plated the run even if the bunter was out at first on the previous play — but it added spice. The sweep by the Tigers was bad, but one gets the sense that we’re seeing the Indians’ season sort of ending before our eyes.

Brewers 8, Pirates 1, Pirates 9, Brewers 2: In the first game Chris Narveson allowed no runs in five and a third and drove in two for himself. I’m kind of a stats moron, but when I see something like that I feel like making up — with a totally straight face — some baloney metric about NL pitcher run differential or something and see if I can get anyone to run with it. Game two: Zack Greinke was rocked, allowing seven runs on seven hits. (and not driving in any, making his NLPRD a negative 7).

Nationals 4, Diamondbacks 1: The Diamondbacks keep skidding out of control. They’ve scored seven runs in six games. Damn shame someone has to represent the NL West in the playoffs. Not that there’s anyone else that we can allow in in their place, what with there only being three good NL teams this year apparently.

Tigers 5, Rays 2: You’ll be shocked to learn that the Tigers won a Justin Verlander start (7 IP, 3 H, 1 ER, 8K). Jhonny Peralta drove in two. He’s having the quietest .315/.361/.512 season for a shortstop in recent memory.

Orioles 4, Twins 1: J.J. Hardy — former Twin — hit a homer. It inspired Gleeman to make the following observation during last night’s game:

J.J. Hardy has 24 homers in 383 at-bats. Twins’ entire infield, including anyone to play 1B, 2B, SS, or 3B, has 37 homers in 2,320 at-bats.

But no, the Twins had no use for the guy at all.

Braves 3, Cubs 0: Jair Jurrjens had been beaten up in four of his last five starts, so he needed this. Jose Constanza went 2 for 3 and scored a run and … left with an ankle injury. Even if you’re in the “he’s gonna turn into a pumpkin soon” camp, losing him for any amount of time wouldn’t be good because, you know, he still hasn’t turned into a pumpkin. Seems minor, though.

Rockies 9, Astros 5: The Astros had baserunners all night — they had 11 hits off starter Jhoulys Chacin — but couldn’t do much of anything with them. The Rockies got an early 6-0 lead off Brett Myers who, in hindsight, probably didn’t deserve that contract extension he received last year.

Dodgers 2, Cardinals 1: St. Louis took a 1-0 lead into the ninth. After starter Chris Carpenter — who had shut L.A. out for eight innings — hit the first batter he faced in the ninth, La Russa did the “let’s use three pitchers to face three batters thing.” Arthur Rhodes struck out Andre Ethier, but then Fernando Salas surrendered a triple to Aaron Miles, he got yanked, and then Jason Motte induced a grounder that Rafael Furcal bobbled, allowing the go-ahead run to score.

Rangers 4, Red Sox 0: C.J. Wilson and the trio of Uehara, Adams and Feliz shut out Boston. A three-run homer for Mike Napoli was the big blast.

Joe Maddon’s biggest influence? Michael Scott, naturally

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 28:  Manager Joe Maddon of the Chicago Cubs speaks to the media before the game in Game Three of the 2016 World Series against the Cleveland Indians at Wrigley Field on October 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
Getty Images

We all get inspiration from various sources. Sometimes, it comes from a mentor or peer who has excelled in their field. Sometimes, it’s a video of a dog owner dressing up as his golden retriever’s favorite chew toy (just me? Okay).

If you’re Cubs’ manager Joe Maddon, it’s Michael Scott, regional manager of the Scranton branch of Dunder Mifflin, Inc., founder of the Michael Scott Paper Company, and one-time star of the hit television show Fundle Bundle. At least, that’s what he told the press during the club’s pregame conference on Friday afternoon.

Thankfully, the Cubs don’t have to worry about Maddon emulating the more outlandish behaviors Steve Carell exhibited on The Office. If anything, the praise Michael heaps on himself as the World’s Best Boss could be aptly applied to Maddon’s managerial style — Spencer Gifts mug and all.

World Series Game 3 lineups: Carlos Santana will be in left field

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians warms up prior to Game One of the 2016 World Series against the Chicago Cubs at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
Getty Images

People have been drinking in Wrigleyville since before 8am this morning. There are throngs of people out on the streets and packing every bar in the vicinity and it’s still four hours until first pitch. I realize I’m an old man who rarely leaves his home, but that looks exhausting even by the standards of normal degenerates. Be safe, everyone!

As for the game, the Indians are doing it: Carlos Santana is playing left field, keeping his bat and he bat of Mike Napoli in the lineup. I mentioned this morning that Santana has played exactly one game in the outfield in his career, and that that came four years ago. Allow me to reiterate that. And to remind everyone that, in baseball, the ball tends to find you. I can picture a sinking liner to left right now and it’s not a pretty picture. If you’re an Indians fan, pray that I’m wrong, but don’t act like you can’t picture it too.

Of course, this being baseball, he’ll probably rob someone of a homer and hit two himself while Napoli goes for the cycle. Never try to predict this stuff, folks.


1. Carlos Santana (S) LF
2. Jason Kipnis (L) 2B
3. Francisco Lindor (S) SS
4. Mike Napoli (R) 1B
5. Jose Ramirez (S) 3B
6. Lonnie Chisenhall (L) RF
7. Roberto Perez (R) C
8. Tyler Naquin (L) CF
9. Josh Tomlin (R) P


1. Dexter Fowler (S) CF
2. Kris Bryant (R) 3B
3. Anthony Rizzo (L) 1B
4. Ben Zobrist (S) LF
5. Willson Contreras (R) C
6. Jorge Soler (R) RF
7. Javier Baez (R) 2B
8. Addison Russell (R) SS
9. Kyle Hendricks (R) P