Former Rockies outfielder Cory Sullivan aims for front office job

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Cory Sullivan never officially announced his retirement after the Phillies let him go from Triple-A earlier this year, but he’s done as an active player and is looking for a front-office job, the Denver Post’s Troy Renck reports.

Sullivan, a six-year major league veteran, hit .271/.327/.381 in 1,127 at-bats, most of them coming with the Rockies.  He was Colorado’s primary center fielder for much of 2005 and ’06 — his claim to fame came on Apr. 9, 2006, when he became the first player since 1951 to triple twice in an inning — but then the Rockies traded for Willy Taveras to start over him in 2007.

Sullivan always had more of a fourth outfielder’s skill set anyway.  However, he had a surprisingly hard time finding work as a reserve.  After spending most of 2008 in the minors with the Rockies, he did play fairly well for the Mets in 2009, hitting .250/.338/.382 in 157 at-bats.  Still, he again struggled to find work afterwards and that he hit just .188 in 64 at-bats for the Astros in 2010 pretty much ended his career.

So now, having just turned 32, Sullivan is looking to break into some team’s scouting department, with higher aspirations along the way.  Former teammates Troy Tulowitzki and Chris Iannetta both believe he has what it takes to advance.

“He was brutally honest. And he knows the game,’’ Tulo said. “He’s had success, and he’s failed. He’s been in different situations. Those things can only help you, in my opinion, if you go into the front office.’’

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.