Burnett, Girardi exchange words after another dismal effort

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Yankees right-hander A.J. Burnett was pulled from Saturday evening’s 9-4 loss to the Twins after allowing five hits, three walks and seven earned runs in less than two innings of work. A normal major league starter would hang his head after such an effort and find a spot near the end of the dugout bench to soak in the rest of the game. Not Burnett.

After handing the ball off to Yankees manager Joe Girardi, Burnett delivered a curse word (bullsh–) over his shoulder and headed directly into the visitor’s clubhouse at Minnesota’s Target Field. Girardi later followed him down the steps, presumably to ask Burnett what exactly he considered to be “bullsh–.”

Girardi played down the incident in his postgame press conference and actually took offense to the media’s interest in his relationship with Burnett. Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News has the quotes:

“You can write what you want, you can say what you want, but he was pissed because he thought he struck out Joe Mauer (on a called ball four; it was Burnett’s last batter),” Girardi said. “I asked if they thought it was a strike and the guys said they thought it was a strike.”

“This is silly; this is really, really silly. You know what? We had a fistfight, is what we had,” Girardi continued, sarcastically. “I came in and looked at the pitch. Our video room is right down there. Everyone always seems to want to blow it up about A.J., A.J., A.J.; nothing happened between me and A.J.; I went and looked at the pitch.”

Girardi is right for defending his player, and is right to want to keep his interpersonal relationships out of the media, but does Burnett really deserve such gentle treatment? The 34-year-old has surrendered 21 runs and 35 hits in his last 17 2/3 innings, yet has the audacity to show up his manager when lifted from a poor outing.
Burnett will earn $16.5 million annually through the end of 2013 and carries a 10-team no-trade clause.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.