Tom Ricketts hates Boise’s ballpark

10 Comments

A few minutes ago I tweeted that how interesting a news day it is is inversely related to how early in the day I simply put “baseball” in a Google search in an effort to find something worth posting about. Well, I did that just a few minutes ago — pretty early for me — but as is often the case I found something randomly fun.

Seems that Cubs owner Tom Ricketts is taking a tour of Cubs minor league facilities.  And when he got to Boise, Idaho — home of a Class-A Boise Hawks — he didn’t play friendly ambassador:

“The facility here is below standard,” Ricketts told the Boise Chamber of Commerce Monday. “All the (minor-league) facilities we have are substantially better.”

The article then speculates that Ricketts’ statements would spur some local effort to get a new ballpark built. Also worth noting that Ricketts did not pledge any of his own or his team’s money to do it.

It’s times like these when I wish the people of Boise — or wherever this kind of thing goes down — would send simply tell the Tom Rickettseseses of the world to put up, shut up or drop dead.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.

Asdrubal Cabrera requests trade from Mets

Getty Images
5 Comments

It’s shortstop or bust for Asdrubal Cabrera, who told reporters Friday that he will request a trade from the Mets after getting bumped to second base (via Newsday’s Marc Carig). Cabrera served as the club’s starting shortstop through the first few months of the 2017 season, but lost the role to Jose Reyes while serving a stint on the 10-day disabled list with a sprained left thumb. The switch was confirmed prior to the Mets’ series opener against the Giants on Friday, prompting Cabrera to announce his trade request before taking the field.

Per MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo:

Personally, I’m not really happy with that move,” Cabrera said. “If they have that plan, they should have told me before I came over here. I just told my agent about it. If they have that plan for me, I think it’s time to make a move. What I saw the last couple of weeks, I don’t think they have any plans for me. I told my agent, so we’re going to see what happens in the next couple weeks.

Mets’ GM Sandy Alderson appeared skeptical of Cabrera’s request, telling reporters that he wasn’t sure a trade was “something [Cabrera] really wishes” and saying the team would wait and see how the situation shakes out. That doesn’t mean the veteran infielder will see a return to short anytime soon, however, only that he might have a change of heart after settling into his new role.

This isn’t the first time Cabrera has balked at a position change. The Mets reportedly considered shifting him to third base earlier this season, but ultimately decided to keep him at short and denied his request to pick up his $8.5 million option for 2018, something Alderson said has little to no precedent. Further changes may be on the horizon when 21-year-old infield prospect Amed Rosario gets called up from Triple-A Las Vegas and second baseman Neil Walker returns from the disabled list, though the team has yet to address either situation.