This year’s draft picks got $228 million in combined bonuses

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Note: I’ve corrected some figures that were initially listed wrongly.

Jim Callis of Baseball America reports that the 2011 draft class received a grand total of $228 million in signing bonuses, with their total guaranteed money rising to $236 million once major-league contracts are factored in.

That represents a 16 percent increase over last season, when the 2010 draft class combined for a then-record $196 million in signing bonuses and $202 million in total guaranteed money.

In other words, MLB’s attempt to suppress bonuses by bullying teams into following their “slot” recommendations hasn’t exactly gone as planned. Teams spent $132 million for players signed on the August 15 deadline day alone.

And while $228 million for a bunch of high school and college players sounds like an insane amount of money–and it certainly is, on a player-by-player basis–collectively the draft class will ultimately provide far more value than that to teams during their cost-controlled, pre-free agency seasons. And it would have been $231 million had Tyler Beede not turned down the Blue Jays for Vanderbilt.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”