The reactions to Jim Thome’s 600th are just as interesting as the feat itself

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I offered to my congratulations to Jim Thome on his 600th home run in the recaps this morning. In response, my Twitter friend Ross offered the following:

You say congrats to Thome but with your way [i.e. my not liking the DH]  he would have never got 600. This is why I like the DH, hitters keep hitting.

My response:

Hey, we can simultaneously (a) wish the world was different; but (b) appreciate the joys that result from the way it is.

To which Ross responded:

I think you inadvertently explained the popularity of Jersey Shore in a profound way.

Yikes. My apologies for providing intellectual cover for more bad TV.  I feel kinda dirty now.

But it’s OK, because this is all part of a greater “what we’re supposed to feel about Jim Thome’s 600th home run” conversation that has been brewing today.  On the one hand, we have a lot of the expected “Jim Thome is a great guy who is corn-fed and country strong and isn’t this all swell stuff.”  We also have some “man, I’m tired of this ‘Jim Thome is a great guy who is corn-fed and country strong and isn’t this all swell stuff'” stuff. The whole idea/backlash thing is pretty much what the internet is made for, so this isn’t unexpected.

And of course some are trying to put it in statistical context, which inevitably takes some of the magic away, which some of you will think is awful and some of you will like just fine.

At times like these — milestones, I mean — I’m more and more inclined to remember the beer and think more in terms of celebrations than assessments.  We’ve had the chance to assess Thome’s career and character for the past 20 years. When it’s time to start talking about his Hall of Fame case, we’ll have the chance to assess it objectively then too (though, as the link makes clear, we should remember the beer some then too).  But on the day after something happens, hey, good on the guy.

But not Ryan Howard. I’ll go after that guy until I draw my last breath and make a point to never celebrate his accomplishments no matter how lofty they are.*

*Note: may be an exaggeration

Rich Hill has a perfect game through eight innings

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UPDATE: He’s perfect through eight! He has ten strikeouts on the night. One more inning to go. And, of course, the Dodgers need to give him at least one run or else this thing doesn’t end in nine. Note: No Dodgers pitcher has tossed a perfecto since Sandy Koufax did it against the Chicago Cubs on September 9, 1965.

9:09 PM: Dodgers starter Rich Hill is facing off against the Pirates in Pittsburgh tonight. And he’s not having any trouble with them: he’s absolutely perfect though seven innings. He’s needed 73 pitches to get that far, so if he can keep the perfection up he certainly has enough in the tank to finish it.

Thing is: he may not even get the win. That’s because Pirates starter Trevor Williams has blanked the Dodgers through eight, scattering seven hits and four walks yet, somehow, not allowing a run to score.

The Pirates are coming to bat in the bottom of the eighth. We’ll keep you posted.

Zach Britton’s consecutive saves streak has ended at 60

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On September 20, 2015, Zach Britton blew a save against the Rays. Little did he know that he wouldn’t blow another save until August 23, 2017, converting 60 consecutive save opportunities.

Britton took the mound with a 7-5 lead in the top of the ninth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Athletics. He yielded a single to Jed Lowrie, a double to Boog Powell, an RBI single to Marcus Semien, and a sacrifice fly to Matt Joyce to allow the A’s to close the two-run deficit. In the next at-bat, he uncorked a wild pitch and then walked Khris Davis before being removed from the game. Miguel Castro relieved Britton, but walked Ryon Healy on four pitches to load the bases. Castro wriggled out of the jam by getting Matt Olson to pop up and striking out Matt Chapman, stranding two of Britton’s runners.

Britton entered Wednesday’s action 11-for-11 in save chances on the season with a 2.88 ERA and a 19/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. He missed two months earlier this season with a strained left forearm.