Is televising the Little League World Series really necessary?

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Jelisa Castrodale — who has the good sense to both (a) write for NBC; and (b) come from the same hometown as me — has a column up today about the Little League World Series. Specifically, about it being televised. And she wonders whether it’s too much:

I know that ESPN is increasing the production values — and their broadcast product — to get the biggest impact out of Williamsport’s Little stage. But, to me, it has the opposite effect. It makes the players seem more like characters and less like kids. It seems less spontaneous and more staged, less precious and more pressured, equal parts Baseball Tonight and Toddlers & Tiaras.

It’s not some lame “will someone please think of the children” rant, however. There’s a good joke in there about birth control pills. Definitely worth your time.

Personally, I find the coverage of the Little League World Series a bit distasteful. I don’t think it’s ruinous or anything — these kids get way more pressure from parents putting them into hyper-competitive situations than they do from whatever Harold Reynolds or whoever has taken his place in these broadcasts dishes out — but I could do without the closeups of kids crying and the creeping professionalization of the whole thing. It’s way too slick, and Jelisa’s reference to the kiddie beauty pageants isn’t too far off.

Eh, it’s not like I watch it anyway. I’m gonna watch “The Bad News Bears” a few times instead. The Walter Mathhau version.

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.