Former big leaguers Tony Phillips and Mike Marshall fight as Jose Canseco manages

18 Comments

When he’s not busy tweeting about his depressing love life Jose Canseco manages the Yuma Scorpions of the independent North American Baseball League, which believe it or not isn’t even close to the weirdest part of this story detailed by Steve Dilbeck of the Los Angeles Times.

One of the Yuma players is Tony Phillips, who was teammates with Canseco on the A’s in the 1980s, last played in the majors way back in 1999, and is now 51 years. And not only is he still playing, Phillips is in good enough shape to get into brawl.

But wait, it gets crazier. Monday he got into a fight with Chico Outlaws manager and former Dodgers outfielder Mike Marshall, who’s 51 years old and played against Phillips and Canseco in the 1988 World Series.

(Dilbeck also notes that Marshall dated Belinda Carlisle back in the 1980s, which has absolutely nothing to do with the fight but is nonetheless very impressive for anyone familiar with the Go-Go’s.)

The 5-foot-9 Phillips punched the 6-foot-5 Marshall, who’s now pressing battery charges, and both men have been suspended for three games. And here’s video of the craziness:

Why more baseball players don’t kneel

Associated Press
Leave a comment

Bruce Maxwell was the first baseball player to kneel for the National Anthem. There may be others who do so, but I don’t suspect many will. Indeed, I’m pretty confident that the protests we’re seeing in the NFL today, and will see more of once basketball season begins, will not become a major thing in baseball.

Some will say it’s because baseball or baseball players are more patriotic or something, but I don’t think that’s it. Yes, baseball is a lot whiter and has a lot of conservative players who would never think to protest during the National Anthem or, for that matter, protest anything at all, but I suspect there are many who saw what Colin Kaepernick and other football players have done — or who have listened to what Steph Curry and LeBron James have said — and agreed with it. Yet I do not think many, if any of them will themselves protest.

Why? I think it mostly comes down to baseball’s culture of conformity.

Almost everyone in baseball comes through a hierarchy. Even the big names. Even if you are the consensus number one pick, you do your time in the minors. Once there, conformity and humility is drilled into you. This happens both affirmatively, in the form of coaches telling you to act in a certain way and passively, by virtue of all players being in similar, humbling circumstances. Bus rides, cheap hotels, etc. In that world, even if you are ten times better and ten times richer than your teammates, you fall in with the crowd because doing otherwise would be socially disruptive.

The very socialization of a baseball player is dependent upon them learning to talk, walk and carry themselves like all those who came before. No one is given special treatment. In the rare cases they are, it’s head-turning. Bryce Harper was a more or less normal minor leaguer, but since he got their earlier by bypassing his final years of high school, he was thrown at and challenged in ways no other minor league stars are. It does not take much for a guy to be singled out for punishment or mockery and even the superstars like Harper are not on solid professional ground as long as they’re still in the minors. Indeed, between a player’s education, as it were, in the minors and their pre-free agency residency in the majors, it can be a decade or more before a unique personality or a true showman is able to shine through, and by then few are willing. They’ve been conditioned by that point.

Even budding superstars can be roundly criticized for the tiniest of perceived transgressions or the most modest displays of individuality. Think about all of the “controversies” we have about the proper way to celebrate a home run or run the bases. If that’s a cause for singling out and, potentially, benching or being traded or being given a shorter leash, imagine the guts a baseball player has to have in order to do something like take a knee during the National Anthem. A guy with multiple MVP Awards would likely be in an uncomfortable spotlight over such a thing, so imagine how brave someone like Bruce Maxwell, who has barely 100 games under his belt, has to be to have done it.

CC Sabathia, a 17-year veteran, spoke out yesterday, but I suspect he won’t kneel for the National Anthem when he lines up with his teammates before the Wild Card game next week. Other ballplayers will likely wade into the fray in the coming days. But I suspect baseball’s very nature — it’s very culture — will keep ballplayers from following in the footsteps of the many NFL players who took a knee today.

 

Bronson Arroyo retires from baseball

Getty Images
1 Comment

Zach Buchanan of the Cincinnati Enquirer reports that Reds’ right-hander Bronson Arroyo has decided to officially retire from Major League Baseball. At this point, the announcement shouldn’t come as a surprise. The 40-year-old starter was placed on the Reds’ 60-day disabled list after sustaining a right shoulder strain several months ago and hasn’t pitched in a game since June.

On Saturday, the Reds honored Arroyo during a pre-game retirement ceremony, gifting the pitcher with a rocking chair and custom guitar, among other commemorative gifts. He returned after the game — a 5-0 loss to the Red Sox — and showcased another of his talents with a 40-minute concert.

The timing of the ceremony was fitting, too. Not only had Arroyo logged nine seasons with the Reds, compiling a 4.18 ERA and 16.4 fWAR over a whopping 279 starts in Cincinnati, but he also spent a memorable three seasons with the Red Sox from 2003-2005 and helped carry them to an incredible, drought-snapping World Series championship in ’04. While he didn’t have the most dominant run in 2017, dragging a 7.35 ERA, 2.4 BB/9 and 5.7 SO/9 through 71 innings before succumbing to injury, the fact that he made another run at the majors was miracle enough.

“It feels now like my senior year in high school and I’m ready to get out,” Arroyo said. “I’m honestly ready to go.”