Tim Hudson knows he wouldn’t stand a chance against Jose Constanza

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The AJC’s David O’Brien has a nice article up today on Braves rookie sensation Jose Constanza, who apparently goes by “Georgie” in the Atlanta clubhouse.  And just what sort of article would it be without the traditional quote about how the ace never likes to face one of those pesky singles hitters:

“For me, personally, I’d rather face a guy like Barry Bonds than someone like [Constanza],” said  pitcher Tim Hudson. “I want somebody up there that’s trying to hit homers; you have a tendency to get those guys to swing and miss. Constanza, I mean he’s pesky, he’s going to put the ball in play. A ball on the ground, more than half the time it’s going to be a hit.”

And, yeah, maybe he has a point.  But boy did he use a bad example in this case.  Bonds went 11-for-27 with five homers and just one strikeout against Hudson, good for a .407/.500/1.000 line.  Maybe he would have been better off saying Troy Glaus, who hit .175 with one homer in 57 at-bats against Hudson, or Alfonso Soriano, who has hit .154 with three homers in 39 at-bats.

Or maybe he should have just passed entirely, because it sure looks like Hudson has handed singles hitters extremely well in his career.  David Eckstein hit .242 in 66 at-bats, Darin Erstad came in at .243 in 70 at-bats, Ichiro is at .215 in 65 at-bats and Cristian Guzman was at .206 in 63 at-bats.  Those are all of the “singles hitters” that Hudson has faced 60 or more times.  One has to scroll down to Omar Vizquel (.314 in 35 at-bats) and Orlando Palmeiro (.382 in 34 at-bats) to find any singles hitters having fared well against Hudson.

Certainly, none have owned him like Ryan Howard (.298, 6 HR in 47 AB), Albert Pujols (.448 in 29 AB), Adam Dunn (355, 4 HR in 31 AB) and Carlos Delgado (.310, 7 HR in 58 AB).

Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio

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In something of a surprising move, the Chicago Cubs fired their pitching coach, Chris Bosio on Saturday. Bosio had held the job since the 2011-12 offseason.

The Cubs made the NLCS this year, but were nowhere as near the formidable as their 2016 World Series champion iteration. While there were several reasons for that, one was that the pitching staff, which featured multiple, better-than-expected performances in 2016, but took a step back in 2017. Some of that was personnel — Joe Maddon did not have Aroldis Chapman to call on in the postseason like he did last year — and a lot of that was mere regression from veterans like Jon Lester and John Lackey. A lot of it had to do with a much higher walk rate this year than in the past.

Still, there was no chatter during the season or at the time of the Cubs’ playoff exit the other day that Bosio might be a fall guy. The Chicago Tribune reports that it was Joe Maddon’s call and that he had grown displeased with Bosio. The Tribune report suggests that Cubs pitchers will be displeased with the move as they were devoted to Bosio. Coaches, of course, come and go, so I suspect they’ll get over it.

Whatever the case, Bosio likely won’t say unemployed for long. He is widely credited with helping Jake Arrieta transform from a project to an ace and for the considerable and the somewhat unexpectedly successful development of Kyle Hendricks. The Tribune suggests that he’d be a good fit in Minnesota, where his former teammate Paul Molitor is in search of a new pitching coach.

There are several intriguing coaches available at the moment, most notably Mike Maddux, who has been the Nationals pitching coach but whose status is now in flux given the firing of Dusty Baker. Maddux’s brother Greg, of course, is a spring training pitching instructor for the Cubs. The Tribune adds that Maddon may look to his old Tampa Bay Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey or, possibly, even recently fired Red Sox manager John Farrell, who made his bones as a pitching coach.