Logan Morrison takes “not so subtle jab at Hanley Ramirez”

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Shortly after the Marlins placed Hanley Ramirez on the disabled list with a sprained left shoulder Logan Morrison took what Juan C. Rodriguez of the South Florida Sun Sentinel describes as a “not so subtle jab at Ramirez.”

Rodriguez has the details:

“What we don’t have is experience and a veteran who is in the lineup every day that can be an anchor for us. We don’t have it.”

Asked whether Ramirez could be that anchor, Morrison said: “I guess, but he’s not there every game. It’s 162 games. It’s not a 100-game season.”

Remember, it was Morrison who earlier this season called out Ramirez in the clubhouse for his arrival times.

I’m a big Logan Morrison fan in large part because of how active he is on Twitter and how much of his amusing personality he typically shows, but I’m not exactly sure what’s accomplished by repeatedly calling out Ramirez in public, particularly in this case when he’s done nothing wrong except get hurt.

And the notion that “he’s not there every game” loses steam once you look beyond this season. Ramirez played at least 142 games in each of the previous five seasons, missing an average of just 10 games per year. That doesn’t qualify him for Iron Man status or anything, but it’s misguided to act as though Ramirez is a disabled list regular just because he’s currently injured. And if instead “he’s not there every game” refers to Ramirez’s mental state and/or effort level, then it’s an even bigger public call-out.

Morrison, incidentally, spent three weeks on the disabled list with a sprained foot back in May and has played exactly one more game than Ramirez this season, missing time earlier this week with a knee injury.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.