Logan Morrison takes “not so subtle jab at Hanley Ramirez”

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Shortly after the Marlins placed Hanley Ramirez on the disabled list with a sprained left shoulder Logan Morrison took what Juan C. Rodriguez of the South Florida Sun Sentinel describes as a “not so subtle jab at Ramirez.”

Rodriguez has the details:

“What we don’t have is experience and a veteran who is in the lineup every day that can be an anchor for us. We don’t have it.”

Asked whether Ramirez could be that anchor, Morrison said: “I guess, but he’s not there every game. It’s 162 games. It’s not a 100-game season.”

Remember, it was Morrison who earlier this season called out Ramirez in the clubhouse for his arrival times.

I’m a big Logan Morrison fan in large part because of how active he is on Twitter and how much of his amusing personality he typically shows, but I’m not exactly sure what’s accomplished by repeatedly calling out Ramirez in public, particularly in this case when he’s done nothing wrong except get hurt.

And the notion that “he’s not there every game” loses steam once you look beyond this season. Ramirez played at least 142 games in each of the previous five seasons, missing an average of just 10 games per year. That doesn’t qualify him for Iron Man status or anything, but it’s misguided to act as though Ramirez is a disabled list regular just because he’s currently injured. And if instead “he’s not there every game” refers to Ramirez’s mental state and/or effort level, then it’s an even bigger public call-out.

Morrison, incidentally, spent three weeks on the disabled list with a sprained foot back in May and has played exactly one more game than Ramirez this season, missing time earlier this week with a knee injury.

Report: Mets ownership backs Terry Collins

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The Mets entered Sunday night’s game against the Pirates with a disappointing 20-27 record. While the club has dealt with a litany of injuries, manager Terry Collins has also drawn criticism for in-game decision-making, particularly regarding his decision-making.

Owner Fred Wilpon is still Collins’ strongest supporter, however, Newsday’s Marc Carig reports. As a result, the team is unlikely to make a managerial change anytime soon. If the Mets continue to struggle, though, ownership may feel pressured to make a change.

Collins became the longest-tenured manager in Mets history last week. Collins managed the Mets to a 77-85 record in 2011 and has overall helped the club go 501-518, winning the NL Pennant in 2015. He is not signed to a contract beyond this season.

Joe Mauer becomes first Twin to reach base seven times in a game since Rod Carew

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Twins first baseman Joe Mauer had a game for the record books on Sunday against the Rays. He finished 4-for-5 with an RBI double, a solo home run, two singles, and three walks in eight plate appearances. Unfortunately for him, the Twins still lost 8-6 in 15 innings.

ESPN’s Stats & Info notes that Mauer is the first Twin to reach base seven times in one game since Rod Carew in 1972 against the Brewers. The last player to reach base seven times in one game (without the aid of an error) was Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford on August 8 last season against the Marlins. The feat has only been accomplished seven times this decade, so about once a year.

After Sunday’s game, Mauer is batting .283/.363/.408 with three home runs, 18 RBI, and 23 runs scored in 171 plate appearances. Not too shabby.