With six days to go before deadline, 14 of top 16 draft picks still unsigned

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It looks like we’re going to have another very busy Aug. 15 this year.  As of Tuesday morning, only nine of the 30 first-round picks have signed.  A mere two of the top 16 have inked deals.

Here’s the top 16:

1. Pirates: RHP Gerrit Cole
2. Mariners: LHP Danny Hultzen
3. Diamondbacks: RHP Trevor Bauer (SIGNED)
4. Orioles: RHP Dylan Bundy
5. Royals: OF Bubba Starling
6. Nationals: 3B Anthony Rendon
7. Diamondbacks: RHP Archie Bradley
8. Indians: SS Francisco Lindor
9. Cubs: SS Javier Baez
10. Padres: 2B Cory Spangenberg (SIGNED)
11. Astros: OF George Springer
12. Brewers: RHP Taylor Jungmann
13. Mets: OF Brandon Nimmo
14. Marlins: RHP Jose Fernandez
15. Brewers: LHP Jed Bradley
16. Dodgers: LHP Chris Reed

In the end, most of these guys are going to sign.  MLB is frowning upon teams giving above-slot contracts to players before the deadline, which works against the ability of teams to get deals done before Aug. 15.  Still, it’d be a surprise if more than one or two of these players went unsigned past the deadline.

The player here many viewed as the toughest signing going in, Starling, is sitting out football practice at Nebraska while negotiating with the Royals.  That would seem to bode well for Kansas City’s chances.

The Red Sox, meanwhile, haven’t signed any of their four first- and supplemental first-round picks.  WEEI’s Alex Speier runs down the situation with No. 19 pick Matt Barnes, No. 26 pick Blake Swihart, No. 36 pick Henry Owens and No. 40 pick Jackie Bradley Jr. here.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 13 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.

Report: Charlie Sheen has original cast on board for Major League III, looking for financial backing

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TMZ is reporting that actor Charlie Sheen has the original cast on board for Major League III but is still looking for financial backing. TMZ cites Sheen referring to the script as “dynamite.”

The original Major League came out in 1989 and debuted at No. 1 at the box office. That spurred a sequel, Major League II, which was released five years later in 1994. Despite negative reviews, II debuted at No. 1 at the box office as well. Major League: Back to the Minors was released in 1998, but tanked at the box office and received mostly negative reviews.

Given that trend, one might wonder why anyone would attempt Major League III, and one would be correct to raise that question. But it’s been 19 years since the last installment and 27 years since the original. People in their early 30’s and 40’s with nostalgia and disposable income will likely be willing to pay to relive a blast from the past. In my humble opinion, Major League is the finest of the baseball movies, so I’ll at least be curious if Sheen ends up getting financial backing.

Sheen has had, well, an interesting life in the last two decades so it’s no sure thing that people with money will trust him to stay out of trouble.