Jered Weaver just doesn’t know how to win (or something)

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When someone uses Jered Weaver’s win total against him in a Cy Young debate–and it’s already happening, with plenty more to come–I hope the sane among us remember last night’s game.

Weaver threw nine shutout innings, striking out eight, walking one, and allowing zero extra-base hits. And he got a no-decision.

And then an inning later the Angels won 1-0 on a walk-off hit, giving the “win” to reliever Jordan Walden for his one scoreless inning of work.

It was actually the second time this season Weaver has thrown nine shutout innings and didn’t get a win and the fourth time he’s allowed zero or one run in seven or more innings and didn’t get a win. Coincidentally, the Angels rank 12th among AL teams in scoring and Weaver has gotten the league’s third-worst run support.

In related news, he has “only” 14 wins despite an MLB-best 1.78 ERA (and MLB-best 6.5 WAR, for the stat-heads in the crowd) and I’m already annoyed by the future articles that will be written touting Justin Verlander and CC Sabathia over Weaver for the Cy Young award on the basis of their slightly higher win totals. My hope is that Zack Greinke and Felix Hernandez winning the award in back-to-back seasons despite modest win totals has convinced enough of the voting base that an individual pitcher’s record is a secondary factor in determining how well he actually pitched, but I’m still skeptical.

Right now Weaver has thrown 177 innings with a 1.78 ERA. Verlander has thrown 181 innings with a 2.24 ERA. Sabathia has thrown 177 innings with a 2.55 ERA. Without knowing how much run support and bullpen support each pitcher has gotten–and those two factors have nothing to do with how well they’ve actually pitched–I certainly know which way I’d vote.

Jose Reyes is hitless in 20 plate appearances to start the season

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Mets backup infielder Jose Reyes pinch-hit and popped up in the top of the eighth inning of Thursday night’s game in Atlanta against the Braves. That ran his streak up to 20 consecutive hitless plate appearances to start the 2018 season. He has reached base once, however, on a walk, so there’s that.

Reyes, 34, signed a one-year, $2 million contract with the Mets near the end of January. At the time, the Mets hadn’t yet signed Todd Frazier, so Reyes was in the mix to contribute as a utilityman but he has operated as a bat off the bench for the most part this season.

One wonders how much longer the Mets are going to let Reyes flounder. According to FanGraphs, he has already been worth a half-win less than a replacement-level player. Only eight other players have been as bad or worse this season.