Aroldis Chapman’s fastball 1, Wrigley Field protective netting 0

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Aroldis Chapman throwing a 99-mph fastball is nothing new, but that pitch sailing wide of the catcher and ripping through the protective netting behind home plate is a scary thought for the people paying big bucks for those seats.

That’s exactly what happened last night at Wrigley Field, although luckily no one was sitting directly behind the plate and (as shown by Chris Calo’s screen shot) the shredded netting was the only thing harmed by Chapman’s heat.

Chapman reined in his fastball enough to strike out two batters in a scoreless inning against the Cubs, giving him a 1.40 ERA and ridiculous 34 strikeouts in 19 innings since returning from the disabled list.

As for avoiding future incidents of the protective netting not being able to protect against Chapman’s fastball, I suppose all the ballparks could double-up with a second layer just to be safe. Or maybe it was an isolated incident in which the Wrigley Field netting already had a slight tear that made it weaker than usual. After all, while Chapman has MLB’s fastest fastball last night was hardly the first baseball–whether thrown or fouled back–to make contact with the netting traveling in the high-90s.

The Baltimore Orioles did not try to get Shohei Ohtani . . . out of principle

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Shohei Ohtani made it pretty clear early in the posting process that he was not going to consider east coast teams. As such, it’s understandable if east coast teams didn’t stop all work in order to put together an Ohtani pitch before he signed with the Angels. The Baltimore Orioles, however, didn’t do so for a somewhat different reason than all of the other also-rans.

Their reason, as explained by general manager Dan Duquette on MLB Network Radio yesterday was “because philosophically we don’t participate on the posting part of it.” Suggesting that, as a matter of policy, they will not even attempt to sign Japanese players via the posting system.

Like I said, that probably didn’t make a hill of beans’ difference when it came to Ohtani, who was unlikely to give the O’s the time of day. I find it really weird, though, that the Orioles would totally reject the idea of signing Japanese players via the posting system on policy grounds. None of their opponents are willing to unilaterally disarm in that fashion, I presume.

More than that, though, why would you make that philosophy public? Don’t you want your rivals to think you’re in competition with them in all facets of the game? Don’t you want your fans to think that you’ll stop at nothing to improve the team?

An odd thing to say for Duquette. I don’t know quite why he’d say such a thing.