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The Diamondbacks are trying to nip a Twitter problem in the bud

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Social media is scary!  Anyone can say anything at any time!  Personal expression can flourish with no supervision!  This is something with which sports teams don’t typically do very well.

So, there are a couple of ways you can go if you run a sports team and are concerned about players saying inappropriate or otherwise sensitive things on Twitter:

1. You can be a dumb caveman, fight the tide of history and individual freedom and simply ban it; or

2. You can be sensible about it and make sure your players are hip to the sensitivities of the organization.

The Diamondbacks, recently stung by some minor leaguers tweeting about transactions that weren’t yet official and thus not really appropriate for public consumption, are taking the second tack:

Club officials say the faux pas tweets frustrated them more than angered them, and the missteps pale compared to incidents involving other teams.

But the Diamondbacks see it as an opportunity to educate. Farm director Mike Bell personally delivered words of warning to players in Reno when he was there last week and each of the club’s minor league managers told their players to exercise caution when interacting on social media.

Good point in the article: the most heavy Twitter usage, not surprisingly, is among minor leaguers, not major leaguers, so this kind of thing is only going to be more important as time goes on.

Also interesting: no mention at all of Kirk Gibson.  The same Kirk Gibson who, back in spring training, I observed had an almost pathological aversion to people carrying around and messing with smart phones.  Players and media alike. Indeed, the day before I was there he apparently got upset at a reporter texting or tweeting something around the training facility. The Dbacks beat reporters had some fun with Gibson the next day by putting all of their phones on Gibson’s podium before his daily press conference, as if they were surrendering them to him before he could get angry.

So, yeah, I wonder if Gibson will be OK with even a smart use of smart phone and social media technology when all of those kids make their way up to the big club.  Maybe he just goes full-Spurrier on them.

Billy Butler activated from the 7-day concussion disabled list

OAKLAND, CA - JULY 24: Billy Butler #16 of the Oakland Athletics celebrates a solo homerun in the bottom of the eighth inning to regain the lead against the Tampa Bay Rays at the Oakland-Alameda Coliseum on July 24, 2016 in Oakland, California.  (Photo by Don Feria/Getty Images)
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The Oakland Athletics have activated DH Billy Butler from the 7-day concussion disabled list.

Butler, you’ll recall, suffered a concussion last weekend in a clubhouse fight with teammate Danny Valencia. The two have since apologized to each other and to the A’s organization for creating what would, if everyone’s being honest, serve as the dramatic peak of the A’s disappointing year.

Speaking of disappointing, Butler is hitting.286/.338/.419 with four homers and 30 RBI in 228 plate appearances this season.

Tim Tebow to work out for 15-20 teams

ARLINGTON, TX - DECEMBER 31:  Broadcaster Tim Tebow of the SEC Network speaks on air before the Goodyear Cotton Bowl at AT&T Stadium on December 31, 2015 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
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FOX Sports’ Jon Morosi reports that Tim Tebow’s baseball workout, which will take place tomorrow in Los Angeles, will be attended by scouts from “roughly half” of the 30 major league teams. Morosi noted in a later tweet that a lot of the people going to see the workout are people “with influence.” That could mean that people are taking him seriously. It could mean that people want to gawk. The proof will ultimately be in the pudding.

As we’ve noted, Tebow is 29 and he asn’t played competitive baseball since high school. While some people who have watched him work out have said complimentary things about his preparation and approach, an anonymous scout told ESPN.com last week that Tebow’s swing is so long it might “take out the front row.”

Color us skeptical until someone who works for a club, as opposed to people who have been invited to coach him, pitch to him or work out with him, says that Tebow has a chance.