Marlins holding preliminary internal talks about a long-term contract for Mike Stanton

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Mike Stanton won’t even be eligible for arbitration until after the 2013 season, but the Marlins are already planning for their future.

According to Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post, the Marlins are holding “preliminary internal talks” about a long-term contract for the young slugger. However, the team hasn’t come up with anything specific in terms of dollars and years and probably won’t make an offer until next year when they move into their new stadium.

Stanton, 21, enters play Friday with a .259/.330/.528 batting line to go along with 25 homers, 67 RBI and an .858 OPS over 427 plate appearances this season. He has 47 home runs over his first 205 major league games. Only Curtis Granderson, Albert Pujols, Mark Teixeira and Jose Bautista have more home runs since Stanton made his major league debut on June 8 of last year.

One comparable mentioned by Capozzi is Brewers’ outfielder Ryan Braun, who signed an eight-year, $45 million contract during his second major league season in 2008. Of course, the Marlins signed shortstop Hanley Ramirez to a six-year, $70 million extension during his third major league season in 2008.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.