Mark Trumbo’s power matched only by his out-making ability

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I was watching the Angels-Twins game last night when Minnesota television analyst Bert Blyleven advised Francisco Liriano to “throw the slider to this big donkey.”

Liriano obliged and Mark Trumbo hit the ball approximately 700 feet for a three-run homer.

It was Trumbo’s 21st homer, which ranks eighth in the AL and is very impressive pop from a rookie. On the other hand, Trumbo is old for a rookie at 25 and his power comes with a ghastly .297 on-base percentage and 80/19 K/BB ratio.

Trumbo is on pace to hit 30 homers with an on-base percentage below .300, which is something only 17 hitters in baseball history have accomplished. Actually, only 14 different hitters, since Dave Kingman did it four times. Here’s the list of 30-homer, sub-.300 OBP seasons during the past 20 years:

                  YEAR      OBP     HR
Mike Jacobs       2008     .299     32
Chris Young       2007     .295     32
Tony Batista      2004     .272     32
Jeromy Burnitz    2003     .299     31
Jose Valentin     2004     .287     30

Oddly, no one hit 30 homers with a sub-.300 OBP during the 1990s, but it happened five times in the 2000s and seven times in the 1980s.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”