Alex Rodriguez

Look, nothing is going to happen to A-Rod over this poker business

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It was rather notable to see the reports — emanating from the entertainment press, not the sporting press — about Alex Rodriguez and the allegedly high-stakes, cocaine-and-Tobey-McGuire-fueled poker games.  Kind of salacious and, because most people like talking about A-Rod, kind of fun.  But let’s be clear about something: the reports that Major League Baseball is looking into this and could dole out some discipline in A-Rod’s direction are kind of silly.

Oh, I have no doubt that someone at Major League Baseball is saying that they’re really concerned and may do something, but that’s a p.r. thing. Because our society is wired in the puritanical way that it is, they can’t just blow off reports of one of their players being in the same room as drugs, gambling and wicked women.  I mean, this isn’t like players driving drunk or beating their wives which are apparently easy things for MLB to ignore.

So someone tells a reporter that baseball thinks it’s serious. A short meeting — complete with photographers to catch A-Rod entering the building in a penitent posture — is held. Some leak occurs in which A-Rod is described as being on double secret probabtion or something and the matter is considered closed.

And there really is no other option.  Unless MLB has stopped testing for cocaine, there is no basis for it to say that A-Rod was taking drugs. Unless the cops came in, busted the card game and arrested everyone, there is no proof that A-Rod was involved in anything illegal.  Unless A-Rod ran out of chips one night and, in order to call Tobey McGuire’s bluff, he threw a paper with “I.O.U. the outcome of five Yankees baseball games” on it, he did not break any rules of Major League Baseball.

This is all about baseball still possessing some vestigial concern that its ballplayers come off as heroic and clean cut young men, as if the last 50 years of American society and cultural evolution never happened.  It’s actually kind of cute and endearing in some weird way.

But it’s not going anywhere. A-Rod is a big boy. If he wants to play cards, he’s gonna play cards. And if Bud Selig truly wants to punish him for it, he’s going to get into a fight with the union he doesn’t want.

And really, deep down, isn’t the image of A-Rod playing high stakes poker with movie stars cooler than most of the other off-the-field glimpses we get of the guy?  Kind of manly! What a bad boy!  Really, Bud, let this one ride. It’s better for everyone.

Zack Greinke named the Dbacks’ Opening Day starter

SCOTTSDALE, AZ - FEBRUARY 21:  Pitcher Zack Greinke #21 of the Arizona Diamondbacks poses for a portrait during photo day at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick on February 21, 2017 in Scottsdale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Not a surprise, but a news item on a slow news day is a news item on a slow news day: Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo has named Zack Greinke as the club’s Opening Day starter.

Greinke’s first season with the Diamondbacks is not exactly what the club hoped for when he signed a six-year, $206.5 million deal in December of 2015. He dealt with oblique and shoulder issues while struggling to a 4.37 ERA over 26 starts. Greinke hasn’t pitched yet this spring, but will make his spring debut on Friday. He and the club are obviously hoping for a quiet March and a strong beginning to the season.

Either for its own sake or to increase the trade value of a player who was acquired by the previous front office regime.

“La Vida Baseball,” celebrating Latino baseball, launches

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A new website has launched. It’s called “La Vida Baseball,” and it’s all about celebrating the past, present and future of Latino baseball from a Latino perspective.

The site, produced in partnership with the Hall of Fame, has four general areas of focus:

  • Who’s Now: Focusing on current Latino players;
  • Who’s Next: Focusing on top prospects here, in the Caribbean and in Central and South America;
  • Our Life: Off-the-Field stuff, including player’s lives, lifestyles and hobbies; and
  • Our Legends: Focusing on Latino baseball history, Hall of Famers and overlooked players.

As the site has just launched there aren’t yet a ton of stories up there, but there is one about Roberto Clemente, another about Felix Hernandez and some other stuff.

The site is much-needed. Baseball reporters for American outlets are overwhelmingly white, non-Spanish speakers. Reporters, who, generally, gravitate to the players who are the most like they are. Which is understandable on some level. When you’re writing stories about people you need to be able to communicate with them and relate to them on more than a mere perfunctory level. As such, no matter how good the intentions of baseball media, we tend to see the clubhouse and the culture of baseball from a distinctly American perspective. And we tend to paint Latino players with a broad, broad brush.

La Vida Baseball will, hopefully, remedy all of that and will, hopefully, give us a fresh and insightful depiction Latino players and their culture.