And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

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Giants 8, Diamondbacks 1: The Giants beat back the charging horde. Three hits and two runs scored for Carlos Beltran, three runs batted in for Orlando Cabrera and a strong six innings for Ryan Vogelsong. Jason Marquis: eh, not quite the game-changing acquisition Kevin Towers may have imagined.

Red Sox 4, Indians 3: Walkoff homer for Jacoby Ellsbury. His second game-winning hit in as many nights.

Mariners 7, Athletics 4: Get the sea-saw Seattle Mariners. Seventeen straight losses not too long ago and now five wins in their last seven. Charlie Furbush allowed one run and two hits while striking out three and not walking anybody. Not a world-beating performance, but it did at least allow me to say “Charlie Furbush.”

Phillies 8, Rockies 6: Ryan Howard drove in four with a homer and a double helping Roy Halladay get his 14th win despite not having his best stuff going.  Six wins in a row for inevitable and irresistible force that is the Philadelphia Phillies.

Brewers 10, Cardinals 5: I touched on this one yesterday. La Russa allowed Edwin Jackson to take just an awful beating. He said that it was because the bullpen needed the rest. Query: what is the point of having a zillion guys in your bullpen like La Russa insists upon if you can’t use the thing every day? Of course, La Russa largely led the charge to eliminate the traditional bullpen roles of “long man” and “mop up man,” each of whom would have been really useful here, so I guess we shouldn’t be shocked.  Three homers for Casey McGehee, by the way. Sorry to slight him here, but I’m still suffering from La Russa derangement syndrome.

Braves 6, Nationals 4: Nice to see that the real Dan Uggla has been returned to the Braves and that impostor Uggla who spent the first three and a half months with the team has been removed. Two-for-four with a big homer as Uggla extends his hitting streak to 25. As for the Nats: I think Chien-Ming Wang may be done. I like the guy, but if you face 23 Braves hitters and fail to strike out a single one, things are bleak. The Braves ain’t picky. Your mama could strike out six Braves hitters on short rest.

Cubs 1, Pirates 0: Matt Garza and Charlie Morton each threw seven shutout innings, but Starlin Castro connected on a solo homer off Chris Resop in the eighth. Oh, and Bob Davidson got all ejecty again in this one, because that’s what he does. Well, that and call an awful, awful strike zone, to the point where the announcers were openly wondering why he was still employed. Six straight losses for the former darlings of the NL Central.

Rays 9, Blue Jays 1: Carlos Villanueva didn’t fool anyone (2.2 IP, 9 H, 8 ER, 3 HR). Casey Kotchman, Ben Zobrist and Robinson Chirinos all went deep, and by then things were out of hand.

Tigers 5, Rangers 4: Doug Fister’s Detroit debut worked out quite nicely (7 IP, 8 H, 2 ER). Homers for Ryan Raburn and Alex Avila.

Twins 11, Angels 4; Michael Cuddyer and Delmon Young each had two homers. One of Cuddyer’s was a grand slam. This is what happens when a sinkerball — in this case Joel Piniero’s — doensn’t sink.

Padres 3, Dodgers 0: Tim Stauffer shut out the Dodgers for six innings. Homer from Jason Bartlett as the Padres avoid the sweep.

Astros 5, Reds 4: Jordan Lyles finally gets the winless monkey off his back. J.D. Martinez was 3 for 4 with a homer and four RBI.

Royals 6, Orioles 2: Luke Hochevar shut the O’s down into the eighth inning. Billy Butler had a three-run homer in the seventh to give the Royals some insurance.

Yankees 18, White Sox 7: Good for the Yankees — rah rah rah — but seriously: A.J. Burnett was given 13 runs to play with — 13! — and he still couldn’t last the five innings to pick up the win.  All kinds of crooked numbers in the box score. Granderson had five RBI. Jeter went 5-for-6 with two runs batted in.

Marlins vs. Mets: POSTPONED: Rain is grace; rain is the sky condescending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.

Odubel Herrera went 0-for-5 with five strikeouts today

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Did you have a bad day? It’s OK. We all do sometimes. It’s just part of life. Even ballplayers have bad days. Even the good ones.

Odubel Herrera is a good one. He’s only 25, but he’s already got two seasons of above average hitting under his belt. Dude gets on base. He could be a regular for tons of teams, so there’s no shame at all in him having a bad day. And boy howdy did he have a bad day today. He went 0-for-5 with five strikeouts in the Phillies extra innings win against the Rockies.

“I feel that I am making good swings but I’m just missing the pitches,” Herrera said.

Well, that is how strikeouts work.

Four strikeouts in a game is known as a Golden Sombrero. Players don’t strike out five times in a game very often so they don’t have an agreed upon name, but I’ve seen it referred to as the “platinum sombrero,” which seems pretty solid for such a feat. Six is a titanium sombrero or a double platinum sombrero, though there are references to it as a “Horn,” for Sam Horn, who deserves something to be named in his honor. Horn is like Moe Greene — a great man, a man of vision and guts — yet there isn’t even a plaque, or a signpost or a statue of him!

But I digress.

The last time a Phillies player did it was when Pat Burrell K’d five times in September 2008. The Phillies won the World Series that year, of course, so maybe this is an omen. [looks at standings] Or maybe not.

Anyway, get a good night’s sleep tonight, Odubel. Shake it off. Tomorrow is another day.

Rachel Robinson to receive O’Neil Award from the Hall of Fame

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NEW YORK (AP) Rachel Robinson will receive the Buck O’Neil Lifetime Achievement Award from baseball’s Hall of Fame on July 29, the day before this year’s induction ceremony.

She’s the wife of late Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, who broke the major league color barrier in 1947. Rachel Robinson created the Jackie Robinson Foundation in 1973, a year after he husband’s death. Rachel Robinson, who turns 95 in July 19, headed the foundation’s board until 1996.

The O’Neil award was established in 2007 to honor individuals who broaden the game’s appeal and whose character is comparable to that of O’Neil. He played in the Negro Leagues, was a scout for major league baseball teams and helped establish the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri.

The award was given to O’Neil in 2008, Roland Hemond in 2011 and Joe Garagiola in 2014.