So I guess the Mets were supposed to keep K-Rod and Beltran

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Mets fans, prepare to roll your eyes.

After years of seeing short-term plans fail to pan out, a changing of the guard at GM and the launching of a smart plan to shed baggage and contracts and try to align the Mets for a more solid long term footing, culminating in good trades of both Francisco Rodriguez (saved money) and Carlos Beltran (landed a top pitching prospect), Filip Bondy whips this out in this morning’s Daily News:

The Mets’ third straight loss would be of little importance, except the Braves have dropped two in a row and six of 10. There was a small, real chance for the Mets to make a serious wild-card move, if Alderson hadn’t exiled both K-Rod and Carlos Beltran.

I’m convinced that guys like Bondy write their columns via some macro that is activated by pressing the “Ctrl” + “contrary jerk” keys.  If the trades hadn’t happened, those same keys would have pinched off a “…while Alderson continues to fiddle while Rome burns …” opus.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.