Rich Harden’s deal fell through over — wait for it — his medical records

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Seeing Rich Harden’s trade to the Red Sox go sideways late last night was rather surprising and rather odd, but now that we know the reason, it’s not that surprising after all:  the Red Sox called it off after looking at his medical records.

Shocking, I know. Here’s how WEEI’s Alex Speier reports it:

A review of medicals after an agreement on the parameters of the deal, according to a baseball source, led to uncertainty about what kind of contribution the Red Sox could expect from Harden down the stretch, and whether he would be able to make enough starts to justify the trade.

I’m sure that “because his medical records are as long as ‘War and Peace’ and as dense as ‘Ulysses’ thus no one in Boston could even get through them” had something to do with it too. They probably found sixteen types of fractures and strains that were heretofore unknown to medical science. I wouldn’t be shocked if there was also information suggesting that Harden has a vestigial twin or something. And that the vestigial twin is injured too.

Speier says that it is unlikely that talks between Boston and Oakland will resume, so this deal is more than mostly dead. It’s just dead.

The Yankees Twitter account roasts the Red Sox account on the anniversary of “The Steal”

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Today is the 13th anniversary of one of the most exciting and iconic plays in postseason history. On October 17, 2004, the Yankees and the Red Sox faced off in Game 4 of the ALCS. The Yankees had a 3-0 lead in the series and held a 4-3 lead in the bottom of the ninth. The Red Sox were three outs from being eliminated by the Yankees. Again.

Kevin Millar led off the inning facing Mariano Rivera and worked the greatest closer in baseball history for a walk. Terry Francona inserted Dave Roberts as a pinch runner. Everyone in the building knew that Roberts had one job: get to second base and scoring position. Despite everyone knowing it was coming, Roberts swiped second base. He’d come around to score, the Sox won the game in 12 innings, would win the next three and the World Series, completing the greatest comeback in postseason history and ending an 86-year championship drought.

Understandably, the Red Sox wanted to remember that wonderful day today. So they tweeted about it:

The Yankees, however, weren’t gonna let that one go by:

Savage.