Koji Uehara a better fit for Rangers than Heath Bell

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The Rangers needed a reliever, not a closer, and they got one of the game’s best setup men from the Orioles when they traded Chris Davis and Tommy Hunter for Koji Uehara and $2 million on Saturday.

Uehara has a 2.27 ERA and a remarkable 117/13 K/BB ratio in 91 innings since the Orioles shifted him to the pen last year.  His trick elbow is a concern, but he’s pretty much the perfect eighth-inning guy when healthy.

And if he can stay healthy, he’ll probably pitch better than Heath Bell would have for the Rangers.  Uehara won’t be intimidated by Arlington after pitching at Camden Yards the last three years.  His ERA+ the last two years is 181.  Bell’s is 175 over the same timeframe.  Bell has the superior actual ERA at 2.08, but after accounting for league and ballpark, Uehara has been a bit more effective.

The Rangers did give up quite a bit in return here, but it was probably worth it to get an eighth-inning guy, particularly one who has a vesting option for next year at $4 million.  And the Orioles did well to get two intriguing pieces for a reliever no one wanted to sign to a multiyear deal last winter.

The 25-year-old Davis seems to have taken a step forward this season after two disappointing years.  His .250/.299/.403 line in 72 at-bats for the Rangers isn’t particularly impressive, but it also isn’t bad for someone getting sporadic playing time.  He was a true terror in Triple-A, hitting .368/.405/.824 with 23 homers in just 193 at-bats.  Davis has always had big problems with strikeouts, but he has improved a bit there this season.

The Rangers soured on Hunter because of his conditioning problems, but he’s a 25-year-old with a career record of 23-13 and a 4.36 ERA in the major leagues.  He can slot into the Baltimore rotation immediately and serve as a decent fourth starter going forward.

I don’t usually rate trades as win-wins, but I think it is the case here.  The Rangers get an excellent reliever for less than Bell would have cost, and the Orioles got to gamble on some upside.  Plus, this frees up Derrek Lee to be used in a deal for Baltimore.  Don’t be surprised if he’s shipped to Pittsburgh within the next few hours, allowing the Orioles to put Mark Reynolds at first and Davis at third.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: