Brad Penny downplays mound argument with Victor Martinez

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Brad Penny and Victor Martinez got into a heated argument on the mound in the middle of the fourth inning yesterday, with Penny being removed from the game a short time later after allowing seven runs in 3.1 innings against the Angels.

Martinez refused to speak about the situation afterward, but Penny downplayed the incident and said the disagreement was over his wanting to come to a set position while the catcher was giving signs:

It had nothing to do with pitch selection or anything like that. With a runner on second, I like to come set taking signs. That way the hitter can’t look at second base and anything there. I’ve pitched my whole career that way, and he didn’t want me to do it. I know there’s no other way for me. I guess it’s a habit. It’s natural. I’ve done it my whole career. It’s not that big of a deal. Me and Victor have been friends for a while now, and that happens when you’re competing.

Martinez declining to talk about it suggests he thinks the argument was a bit more serious, but as Penny notes they worked together with the Red Sox in 2009 and have teamed up for eight starts this season. Prior to yesterday’s disaster outing Penny had a 4.52 ERA with Martinez catching him and liked working with the catcher enough to effusively praise him to the media back in February:

What I liked about Victor is he was never negative in any way. If you’re struggling and he comes out to the mound and talks to you, it’s all positive. I mean, you can see he just knows you’re going to get out of it and do good. You can see it in his eyes. I mean, like I said before, what a great teammate. You guys are going to be really impressed with him as a person, not only as a player.

Martinez is “never negative in any way” and if “he comes out to the mound and talks to you it’s all positive.” Except yesterday, when he started yelling at Penny while walking out from behind the plate and was so upset that he wouldn’t even address the incident with reporters. But other than that, all positive!

Penny and Martinez hadn’t been paired up since June 26 and something tells me it might be more than a month before they work together again.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.