Hideki Irabu: a strikeout king in Japan, underrated in US

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Hideki Irabu, who passed away this week at age 42, was best known for his failures in the United States.  He forced his way to the Yankees after the Padres originally purchased his rights, only to be dubbed a “fat toad” by George Steinbrenner after a series of disappointing performances.

Irabu, though, was hardly a horrible pitcher for the Yankees.  His career got off to a disastrous start in 1997, as he amassed a 7.09 ERA in nine starts and four relief appearances, and his reputation never really recovered.

However, Irabu was a perfectly adequate starter in his two subsequent years in New York, going 24-16 with a 4.44 ERA.  Now, a 4.44 ERA doesn’t sound like much right now, but back then, it was an above average mark.  He had a 103 ERA+ between 1998-99.  (For comparison’s sake, Michael Pineda, Edwin Jackson and Madison Bumgarner are all sporting ERA+s right around 103 this season).

Unfortunately, that was the end of Irabu’s U.S. contribution.  After being traded to the Expos in Dec. 1999, he went 5-15 with a 6.31 ERA in 118 1/3 innings over three injury-plagued seasons, though he actually did manage to record 16 saves for the Rangers in 2002.

Irabu returned to Japan after that and had a nice 2003 campaign, going 13-8 with a 3.85 ERA before knee pain shut him down early in the 2004 season, causing him to retire.  He attempted comebacks afterwards, and as a 40-year-old in 2009, he went 5-3 with a 3.58 ERA for Long Beach of the Golden Baseball League before again calling it a career.

Irabu ended up 72-69 with a 3.55 ERA in Japan.  He led his league in wins in 1994, in ERA in 1995 and ’96 and in strikeouts in 1994 and ’95.

In MLB, he went 34-35 with a 5.15 ERA.  His strong strikeout rate couldn’t overcome his penchant for giving up homers, as he surrendered 91 longballs in just 514 major league innings.

Irabu did collect two World Series rings with the Yankees.  Still, one can’t help but wonder how much better things would have went for him if he OK’d pitching in San Diego.  Pitching in the NL and Jack Murphy/Qualcomm Stadium would helped him out a bunch, given his flyball tendencies, and Irabu never seemed equipped to deal with the pressures of New York.  He probably wouldn’t have duplicated his Japan League success in San Diego, but he likely would have had some 15-win seasons before injuries struck.

Report: Blue Jays and Marco Estrada nearing agreement on contract extension

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Jon Morosi reports that the Blue Jays and starter Marco Estrada are nearing an agreement on a contract extension. The deal is expected to be for one guaranteed year, Morosi adds.

Estrada, 34, was set to become a free agent after the season. He earned $26 million on a two-year contract signed with the Jays in November 2015. While the right-hander has a subpar 4.84 ERA on the season, he has a solid 170/67 K/BB ratio in 176 2/3 innings and has looked much better since the end of July. Between July 31 and his most recent start on Saturday, Estrada owns a 3.75 ERA.

J.A. Happ is the only other starter technically under contract with the Jays next season. Marcus Stroman will be eligible for his second year of arbitration and the Jays will certainly agree to give him a raise on his $3.4 million salary for the 2017 season. The Jays will likely be active this offseason in adding rotation help and they’re starting early by locking up Estrada.

Video: Jackie Bradley, Jr. robs Chris Davis of a home run

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Red Sox center fielder Jackie Bradley, Jr. robbed Orioles first baseman Chris Davis of his 25th home run on Tuesday evening, leaping at the fence in center field to make the catch and keep the game scoreless in the bottom of the fifth inning.

Davis swung at the first pitch he saw from Drew Pomeranz, a slider that crossed the middle of the plate.

This game has potential playoff implications, as the first-place Red Sox hold a three-game lead over the Yankees in the NL East. Meanwhile, the Orioles are still in the AL Wild Card race, trailing the Twins by 5.5 games for the second Wild Card slot.