Is Scott Boras “controlling the process” in Carlos Beltran trade talks?

6 Comments

Strange tweet from Buster Olney a little while ago.  He says that the Cleveland Indians have walked away from talks with the Mets over Carlos Beltran because they are convinced that Beltan’s agent — Scott Boras — is “controlling the process.”

Hmm.  On the one hand, if there is an agent who would try to control the process, it would be Boras.  On the other hand, this could be Cleveland’s way of voicing displeasure over talks that weren’t going the way they liked. Maybe they’re using Boras as a handy excuse. Such a cover story would certainly help quell any fan grumbling if and when the Indians fail to land a bat at the deadline.

One thing that has occurred to me, however, is that if Boras is controlling the process somehow, it may make a possible trade to Atlanta complicated.  The Braves were already thought to be heavily involved in trade talks, and you’d figure their interest would only intensify now that they’ve lost their best hitter for an extended period.  However, the Braves’ front office happens to have some pretty negative feelings for Scott Boras.  Current GM Frank Wren less than John Schuerholz used to have — Schuerholz reportedly vowed to never deal with Boras again — but it’s not like Schuerholz isn’t still hanging around the office.

Probably much ado about nothing — Boras is an easy boogeyman — but interesting all the same.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

Getty Images
19 Comments

Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.