Facts from Ervin Santana’s no-hitter

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Ervin Santana threw the ninth no-hitter in Angels history.  The others:

Bo Belinsky – May 5, 1962 versus the Orioles
Clyde Wright – July 3, 1970 versus the Athletics
Nolan Ryan – May 15, 1973 versus the Royals
Nolan Ryan – July 15, 1973 versus the Tigers
Nolan Ryan – Sept. 28, 1974 versus the Twins
Nolan Ryan – June 1, 1975 versus the Orioles
Mike Witt – Sept. 30, 1984 versus the Rangers (perfect game)
Mark Langston-Mike Witt – April 11, 1990 versus the Mariners

Of course, the Mets, who debuted one year after the Angels in 1962, still don’t have a single no-hitter.  Maybe things would have turned out differently had they kept that Ryan kid.

– It was the first nine-inning no-hitter in which the pitcher gave up a run since Houston’s Darryl Kile beat the Mets 7-1 on Sept. 8, 1993.

Interestingly enough, the Angels themselves had an eight-inning no-hitter in a 1-0 loss to the Dodgers on June 28, 2008.  Jered Weaver threw the first six innings in that one, giving up an unearned run.  Chad Billingsley shut the Angels out, giving the Dodgers a win in a game in which they were outhit 5-0.

– The win today was Santana’s first in 11 career starts against the Indians.  He had been 0-6 with a 4.98 ERA versus Cleveland.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.