After no-hitter, Ervin Santana overshadowed no more


Back in 2003, when Johan Santana was a 20-year-old in the Angels farm system, he worried that he might have to spend his career being confused with that pitcher with the same name who was dominating hitters for the Minnesota Twins.

He thought it might be wise to make a change, to make a name for himself. “I just came up with Ervin … Ervin Santana, that sounds good.”

Indeed it does.

On Wednesday against the Cleveland Indians, Ervin Santana put his name in the history books, becoming the first Santana – Johan, Ervin, Carlos or otherwise — to throw a no-hitter.

He did it with cold-blooded efficiency, throwing 76 of his 105 pitches for strikes. His four-seam fastball averaged 93 mph with plenty of movement, and his slider dropped off the table, yet was thrown for strikes more than 73 percent of the time. (Check out some more facts here)

He allowed only two base runners — one when Ezeqiuel Carrera reached on an Erick Aybar error in the first, and the other on a walk to Lonnie Chisenhall in the eighth — and struck out 10, including five of the final eight batters.

It all added up to a performance that Fangraphs called the most dominant of this season’s three no-hitters, despite the fact he actually allowed a run.

“Good fastball, good slider,” Cleveland Indians manager Manny Acta said. “He just attacked the zone.”

At 81-63 with a 4.31 ERA, Santana’s career has been fairly nondescript. Solid, yet unspectacular. He was overshadowed as a youngster by Johan Santana, and overshadowed as a big leaguer by teammates Jered Weaver and Dan Haren.

Santana has been better than his 6-8 record suggests this season, and has a 2.04 ERA over his last seven starts. But at 28, and with seven big league seasons under his belt, he still resides somewhere in the neighborhood between potential star and possible journeyman.

Is Wednesday’s feat a sign of better things to come? Angels catcher Bobby Wilson, who directed Wednesday’s masterpiece, thinks so, telling Lyle Spencer of

“We talked about attacking hitters. ‘Don’t give them too much credit. You’re here for a reason. Obviously, you have the stuff. Trust it and go after guys.’

“That’s what Ervin did, and if he keeps doing it, he’ll have a better chance every time he goes out there.”

For one day, at least, Santana gets the stage to himself. For one day, he is the ace with his name in lights.

Enjoy the moment, Ervin.

Bonus link: A song about how Santana changed his name.

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Madison Bumgarner diagnosed with fractured left hand

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Giants ace left-hander Madison Bumgarner has been diagnosed with a fractured left hand, per a report from Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. He’ll undergo surgery on Saturday to insert pins in his pinky knuckle, adds The Athletic’s Andrew Baggarly, and is expected miss anywhere from 4-6 weeks in recovery before he’s cleared to throw again. In a best-case scenario, the lefty will be ready to pitch again before the All-Star break, but nothing is set in stone just yet.

Bumgarner suffered the fracture during the third inning of Friday’s Cactus League game against the Royals. Whit Merrifield returned a line drive up the middle and the ball deflected off the top of Bumgarner’s pitching hand before bouncing into the infield. He chased after the ball but was unable to pick it up, and was immediately visited by manager Bruce Bochy and a team trainer before exiting the game.

The 28-year-old southpaw was gearing up for a massive comeback after losing significant playing time with an injury in 2017. During his tumultuous run with the Giants last year, he missed nearly three months on the disabled list after spraining his shoulder and bruising his ribs in a dirt bike accident. He finished the season with a 4-9 record in 17 starts and a 3.32 ERA (his first 3.00+ ERA since 2012), 1.6 BB/9 and 8.2 SO/9 over 111 innings. The Giants suffered as well; by season’s end, their pitching staff ranked seventh-worst in the National League with a cumulative 4.58 ERA and 10.1 fWAR.

This is the second massive injury the Giants’ rotation has sustained this week after right-hander Jeff Samardzija was diagnosed with a strained pectoral muscle on Thursday. “Horrible news for us,” Bochy told reporters after Friday’s game. “That’s all you can say about it. There’s nothing you can do but push on.”