Jeff Conine: I’d probably trade Hanley Ramirez

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Mr. Marlin isn’t down with the team’s present superstar.

Jeff Conine, who served two stints in teal and is currently employed by the Marlins as a special assistant to team president David Samson, went on The Dan LeBetard show Friday and said Hanley Ramirez frustrates him “on a nightly basis” and that he’d “probably” trade the shortstop if it were up to him.

When asked why Ramirez frustrates him so, Conine responded:

I don’t know. I just, I don’t know. I think that obviously Hanley is a phenomenal talent. But as a guy that — I’m probably jealous too, because I didn’t have that kind of talent, but I had to work extremely hard on a nightly basis to put my talent on the field. I think there are some nights where he doesn’t try as hard as he should.

Conine went on to say that Ramirez was “one of the top five talents in baseball,” but that he doesn’t know if he cares enough.

Ramirez had a miserable first three months of 2011 and is currently hitting .249/.338/.394 in 297 at-bats. While he’s been much better of late — he’s hit .348/.434/.636 with five homers and 18 RBI during July — he’s going to need a scorching second half to beat his 2010 numbers, which were already a big disappointment based on what he did from 2007-09.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: