White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper angrily ends interview over Dayan Viciedo


Ozzie Guillen isn’t the only member of the White Sox’s coaching staff on edge these days, as pitching coach Don Cooper angrily hung up during a radio interview this morning when he was asked why the team hasn’t called up Dayan Viciedo from Triple-A.

Cooper is paid to do the weekly phone interview, but the Chicago Tribune describes how things got ugly:

I have no clue about that. I’m a coach,” Cooper fumed during his session on “The Mully & Hanley Show” on WSCR-AM 670. “Do I feel like something [needs to be done]? Yeah, we have to score some runs. That’s what’s got to be done. And if we do, we have a chance to win. And if we don’t, we won’t.

Nice try, asking me to bring up [bleeping] Viciedo. I not in charge of making moves, I’m in charge of coaching. When host Brian Hanley told Cooper that he wasn’t trying to put him on the spot, Cooper hung up.

Cooper’s tantrum follows Guillen’s postgame freakout last night and speculation that the White Sox may try to put Adam Dunn on the disabled list with a questionable knee injury in order to get him out of the lineup and call up Viciedo.

Chicago is in third place at 47-51 and Minnesota is in fourth place at 46-51, yet the White Sox appear to be coming apart at the seams and the Twins are doing everything they can not to start printing playoff tickets.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.